URI-EICHEN GALLERY

PAST EVENTS


Shake the World
The Russian Revolution- 100 Years Later


Closing: Wednesday
November 29, 6-10pm,


URI-EICHEN Gallery 2101 S Halsted
Chicago IL 60608


info@URI-EICHEN.com

The working class in Russia “shook the world” in 1917 when their revolution defeated capitalism and established a socialist democracy. This event inspired workers in every country including the United States to form political parties to try to do the same. This event had a profound effect on labor unions, movements of oppressed nationalities, women, the unemployed and of course artists. Shake the World will display art that expresses a yearning to be free of capitalist exploitation. The visual art and spoken word is inspired by the Bolshevik working class revolution in Russia 100 years ago. Frank Chapman of the Freedom Road Socialist Organization will speak on the significance of the revolution then and today.

Open by appointment only through 12-1-17. Please call 312 852 7717 for an appointment.

ARTISTS:

Myia Brown
Bonnie Coyle
Hayley Hodge
Sydney Hochsprung
Dan Odents
Eala O'Se
Ashley Nelson
Loren Rozewski
Erica Scott

SPOKEN WORD:

GC
Marlena Ceballos
Shadow Master MC





Shake the World
The Russian Revolution- 100 Years Later


Opening: FRIDAY November 10, 6-10pm,

URI-EICHEN Gallery 2101 S Halsted
Chicago IL 60608


info@URI-EICHEN.com

The working class in Russia “shook the world” in 1917 when their revolution defeated capitalism and established a socialist democracy. This event inspired workers in every country including the United States to form political parties to try to do the same. This event had a profound effect on labor unions, movements of oppressed nationalities, women, the unemployed and of course artists. Shake the World will display art that expresses a yearning to be free of capitalist exploitation. The visual art and spoken word is inspired by the Bolshevik working class revolution in Russia 100 years ago. Frank Chapman of the Freedom Road Socialist Organization will speak on the significance of the revolution then and today.

Open by appointment only through 12-1-17. Please call 312 852 7717 for an appointment.

ARTISTS:

Myia Brown
Bonnie Coyle
Hayley Hodge
Sydney Hochsprung
Dan Odents
Eala O'Se
Ashley Nelson
Loren Rozewski
Erica Scott

SPOKEN WORD:

GC
Marlena Ceballos
Shadow Master MC





HotHouse and Marguerite Horberg present Cuba Si! Bloqueo No! Looking at the Revolution


Opening: FRIDAY October 13, 6-10pm,

URI-EICHEN Gallery 2101 S Halsted
Chicago IL 60608
info@URI-EICHEN.com

Photographers: Marc Po Kempner, Rose Blouin, Marguerite Horberg, Eric Torres

Saturday October 14. 4-6pm Introductory remarks by Marguerite Horberg and Eric Torres

Program Selection of Documentary Shorts by Eric Torres.

All Guantánamo is Ours, a 37 minute film with English subtitles, shows the perspective and sentiment of the Cuban people, in particular those living in the towns around Guantanamo, about the illegal occupation of the U.S. Naval Base.

Friday November 3. 6 -11pm 6pm Closing Reception

7-11pm Film Screening double feature, donations accepted

7pm Black and Cuba –Robin Hayes 2013

Street-smart Ivy League students live as outcasts at their elite university, then they band together to go to Cuba to see if revolution is truly possible.

Interlude with remarks by Fanny Rushing and Prexy Nesbitt

9pm Eyes on the Rainbow 20th Anniversary screening !

Filmed in 1997, Eyes of The Rainbow: A documentary film with Assata Shakur was recorded in Cuba 33 years after her exile. It encompasses the African Spirit Oya to illustrate the struggles Shakur has faced as a Revolutionary. Director: Gloria Rolando

Tickets and more information www.hothouse.net

Special thanks to Simon Pyle at Latitude and Peter Kuttner for their kind assistance

Open by Appointment outside of receptions. For an appointment, please call 312 852 7717


100 Years: 1917 and 2017

Alison Jackson's Private- "Donald Trump" Photos. 1917 -2017: What is Today's "War for Democracy?” A second look at the Espionage Act.
Opening: FRIDAY September: 8, 6-10pm
URI-EICHEN Gallery 2101 S Halsted
Chicago IL 60608

info@URI-EICHEN.com

Uri-Eichen Gallery hosts Alison Jackson photographs. Jackson, a British artist, self-published spoof photographs of Donald Trump, despite being told the President of the United States could take legal action against her.

Alison Jackson, who uses lookalikes to make work commenting on the “cult of celebrity” and the deceptive nature of many images, said she was warned against publishing the satirical photographs by her lawyers.

She could not find a publisher prepared to release the "hard-hitting" collection, which features a Trump double having sex with Miss Mexico in the Oval Office and as a member of the Ku Klux Klan. Jackson said she decided to release the images herself because she believes it is wrong to allow artistic freedom to be curtailed.

(http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/alison-jackson-donald-trump-spoof-photos-sued-litigation-self-publishes-a7465041.html)

The enforcement of the Espionage Act in the US during WWI included the Federal Government use of the law to limit US mail service for publications critical of the war or the government. This, in turn, limited distribution of not only articles but also illustrations and cartoons the government determined to be critical, such as the Masses newspaper.

Jackson, in 2016, self published her photos out of fear of lawsuits from Trump. That same man now may enforce the law that 100 years ago, censored journalism and artists in America.

Alison Jackson is a contemporary artist who explores the cult of celebrity – an extraordinary phenomenon created by the media, publicity industries and the public figures themselves. Her work sits squarely in the middle of the current fake news, alternative facts or news debates. Jackson makes convincingly realistic work about celebrities doing things in private using lookalikes. Likeness becomes real and fantasy touches on the believable. She creates scenarios we have all imagined but never seen – the hot images the media can’t get.

Jackson raises questions about whether we can believe what we see when we live in a mediated world of screens, imagery and internet. She comments on our voyeurism, on the power and seductive nature of imagery, and on our need to believe. Her work has established wide respect for her as an incisive, funny and thought-provoking commentator on the burgeoning phenomenon of contemporary celebrity culture.

Alison works across all arts and media platforms in TV, Publishing, books, is widely exhibited in galleries and museums attracting extensive interest in the news and press. Her images themselves have become just as much a part of popular culture as images of the real celebrities.

Open by Appointment outside of receptions. For an appointment, please call 312 852 7717


100 Years: 1917 and 2017

Cosing Reception Silent Sentinels No More! The 1917 Night of Terror and Women Unite Against Trump

THURSDAY August 31, 7-9pm, Film Screening: Iron Jawed Angels
URI-EICHEN Gallery 2101 S Halsted
Chicago IL 60608

info@URI-EICHEN.com

Katja von Garnier's "Iron Jawed Angels" tells the remarkable and little-known story of a group of passionate and dynamic young women, led by Alice Paul (Hilary Swank) and her friend Lucy Burns (Frances O'Connor), who put their lives on the line to fight for American women's right to vote.

Swank and O'Connor head an outstanding female ensemble, with Julia Ormond, Molly Parker, Laura Fraser, Brooke Smith and Vera Farmiga as a rebel band of young women seeking their seat at the table; and such cinematic icons as Lois Smith, Margo Martindale, and Anjelica Huston as the steely older generation of suffragettes.

This true story has startling parallels to today, as the young activists struggle with issues such as the challenges of protesting a popular President during wartime and the perennial balancing act between love and career. Utilizing a pulsing soundtrack, vivid colors, and a freewheeling camera, Katja von Garnier's ("bandits") driving filmmaking style shakes up the preconceptions of the period film and gives history a vibrant contemporary energy and relevance.

Film will start at 7 and is 2 hours and 5 minutes.

Group Show - Women's Marches. Protest Posters and Photos from Holiday Gerry, Ellen Larrimore, Linda Loew, Darlene Seilheimer, Christopher Urias, Lesly Wicks, Shelby Willford, and Heidi Zeiger. Mary Ann and Lucy McDonald’s original and a recreated Suffragette banner. Water Color and ink drawings of Trump’s Cabinet of Horrors by Emily Waters.

Open by Appointment outside of receptions. For an appointment, please call 312 852 7717


100 Years: 1917 and 2017

Silent Sentinels No More! The 1917 Night of Terror and Women Unite Against Trump

Opening: FRIDAY August 11, 6-10pm,
URI-EICHEN Gallery 2101 S Halsted
Chicago IL 60608

info@URI-EICHEN.com

Group Show - Women's Marches. Protest Posters and Photos from Holiday Gerry, Ellen Larrimore, Linda Loew, Darlene Seilheimer, Christopher Urias, Shelby Willford, and Heidi Zeiger. Mary Ann and Lucy McDonald’s original and a recreated Suffragette banner. Water Color and ink drawings of Trump’s Cabinet of Horrors by Emily Waters.

Opening Reception: 7pm Discussion with Artists and Film

Short Film: Why We March

Filmmakers: Laurie Little, Jess Mattison and Theresa Campagna

A reflection on the journey between Chicago and DC, connecting voices of hope, empowerment and intersectionality during The Women's March, the largest protest in the history of the United States, as women and girls organize and rally after the inauguration of the 45th president. Two teams documented the march simultaneously in the two cities as women everywhere went on a journey to connect with their feminist roots. Focusing on intersectionality, mothers and daughters from every strata of the country reflect on the work that is to come for the women's movement and how we can mobilize for change.

Discussion Panel: Scholar/journalist Felicia Darnell, Lucy McDonald, filmmaker Laurie Little on the film. Discussion- Artists in group show- on the march!

Closing Reception: August 31, 7pm to 930pm- Film- Iron Jawed Angels

Open by Appointment outside of receptions. For an appointment, please call 312 852 7717

September: 8 Opening: Alison Jackson's Private- "Donald Trump" Photos. 1917 -2017: What is Today's "War for Democracy?” A second look at the Espionage Act.

The Night of Terror:The Silent Sentinals- On January 10, 1917, the group began their constant protest in front of the White House. Over the rest of the year, the women were arrested, with steadily worsening punishments, until in October, when Alice Paul was sentenced to seven months in prison. Other suffragists followed suit, and they were housed at Occoquan Workhouse.

There, Alice Paul was placed in solitary confinement with a diet of water and bread, which made her so weak that she had to be hospitalized, in which case she started a hunger strike. Other suffragist prisoners followed, and in response, the prison started force-feeding them.

On November 14, 1917, workhouse superintendent W. H. Whittaker ordered guards to brutalize the women. They were beaten, dragged, choked, kicked, and thrown. The night became known as the “Night of Terror.”

The treatment of the women hit the newspapers and got more of the public on their side. By November 28, 1917, all the protesters were released, and their victory only pushed them forward, the protests continuing in earnest.

Then, almost a year since the start of their protests in front of the White House, President Woodrow Wilson announced his support for the women’s suffrage movement on January 9, 1918. The Silent Sentinels then turned their attention to Congress, and by the end of 1918, most members of Congress supported the movement. By June 4, 1919, both houses of Congress had passed the amendment allowing women to vote.

Finally, on August 18, 1920, Tennessee became the 36th state to ratify the 19th amendment, thereby giving women in the United States the right to vote.

The Silent Sentinels were fierce, and their unwillingness to use a conservative approach and look at politicians as allies helped them hold the feet of President Wilson and Congress to the fire. They, along with other suffragists from around the United States, paved the way for women’s rights today.

From: nationalwomansparty.org

How does their struggle connect to women today and to the American public’s struggle to resist Trump?

September: Alison Jackson's Private- "Donald Trump" Photos. 1917 -2017: What is Today's "War for Democracy?” A second look at the Espionage Act


100 Years: 1917 and 2017

The Rise of Hate

THURSDAY August 3, 7-9pm,
URI-EICHEN Gallery 2101 S Halsted
Chicago IL 60608

info@URI-EICHEN.com

Closing Reception: August 3rd 7-9pm Film “Strange Fruit” Discussion panel on film and reading from Christian Picciolini, music and spoken word with Kara Jackson and Antwon “Lord” Funches

Strange Fruit is the first documentary exploring the history and legacy of the Billie Holiday classic. The song's evolution tells a dramatic story of America's radical past using one of the most influential protest songs ever written as its epicenter. The saga brings viewers face- to- face with the terror of lynching even as it spotlights the courage and heroism of those who fought for racial justice when to do so was to risk ostracism and livelihood if white - and death if Black. It examines the history of lynching, and the interplay of race, labor and the left, and popular culture as forces that would give rise to the Civil Rights Movement.

Christian Picciolini is an Emmy® Award-winning television producer, a prolific public speaker, a published author, and a reformed extremist. His work and life purpose are born of an ongoing and profound need to atone for a grisly past, and to make something of his time on this planet by contributing to the greater good. After leaving the violent far-right hate movement he was part of during his youth, he began the painstaking process of rebuilding his life. Christian earned a degree in International Relations from DePaul University, began his own global entertainment media firm, and was appointed a member of the Chicago Grammy Rock Music Committee and board member for the Chicago Intl. Movies and Music Festival. Christian is displaying some objects related to his former skinhead life in this show.

Antwon “Lord” Funches is a Chicago-born Nichiren-Buddhist, playwright,poet, actor, and BA Theater major attending the University of Illinoisat Chicago (UIC). Antwon’s work focuses heavily on a queer Black male perspective, documenting aspects of gender, race, class, and sexuality that inhabit his everyday interactions. Notable accomplishments include: winning Louder Than a Bomb Chicago 2015; winning the National Poetry Book Festival 2015 Slam in Washington, D.C., and winning theSpoken Word category of YoungArts 2015 in Miami, Florida. Antwon is adisciplined craftsman who offers “grey,” human perspectives on polarized social issues.

Kara Jackson’s poetry explores the essence of invisibility, the authentic elements of language, and divine womanhood, along with its placement in the world. She was born in Oak Park, Illinois. As a young activist, she seeks to make women visible and end the violent language spoken between men and women around the world. Her upcoming charity work includes a Period Drive, which seeks to provide feminine products, underwear, and other necessities to homeless women. She is the winner of her sophomore class poetry slam, which included over a hundred students. She has received the Scholastic Art and Writing Award for her short story Nursery Rhymes, which won a silver medal at a national level. Jackson is a member of the Spoken Word club at Oak Park River Forest High school. She represented the school in the Louder Than a Bomb festival in 2016 and 2017. Her work is to be featured in the forthcoming book by Kevin Coval, The End of Chiraq. She recently released her first song Discomfort on Soundcloud.

The Equal Justice Initiative is committed to ending mass incarceration and excessive punishment in the United States, to challenging racial and economic injustice, and to protecting basic human rights for the most vulnerable people in American society.

Ell Persons was lynched in 1917 in Memphis. It was reported at the time that thousands attended the lynching. We will remember Persons and discuss the work of the Equal Justice Initiative at this reception. Through the work of the EJI mapping lynching in America , 800 more victims of this terrorism have been discovered than were known before their research.

Milano’s White Power Worldwide grew out of concern about the growth of the White Power movement within the United States. Beginning with his time spent at ICP in 2012, this project has taken him across the US to Georgia, Kentucky, Tennessee, Virginia, West Virginia, Texas, Ohio, and Arizona. The work concentrates on two different, but allying, groups- the Ku Klux Klan which is a homegrown group and the National Socialist Movement, the country’s largest Neo Nazi group.


100 Years: 1917 and 2017

The Rise of Hate

Looking at the work of the Equal Justice Initiative - Mapping Lynching in the USA and Remembering the Lynching of Ell Persons in 1917. Johnny Milano's Series “White Pride Worldwide” and Christian Picciolini, co-founder of Life After Hate and author of "Romantic Violence: Memoirs Of An American Skinhead", displays objects related to the white supremacist skinhead movement.

Opening: FRIDAY JULY 14, 6-10pm,
URI-EICHEN Gallery 2101 S Halsted
Chicago IL 60608

info@URI-EICHEN.com

Opening Reception: 7pm Reading with Christian Picciolini from "Romantic Violence.” 8pm: Music and Spoken Word with Kara Jackson

Closing Reception: August 3rd 7-9pm Film “Strange Fruit” Discussion panel on film and reading from Christian Picciolini

The Equal Justice Initiative is committed to ending mass incarceration and excessive punishment in the United States, to challenging racial and economic injustice, and to protecting basic human rights for the most vulnerable people in American society.

Ell Persons was lynched in 1917 in Memphis. It was reported at the time that thousands attended the lynching. We will remember Persons and discuss the work of the Equal Justice Initiative at this reception. Through the work of the EJI mapping lynching in America , 800 more victims of this terrorism have been discovered than were known before their research.

Milano’s White Power Worldwide grew out of concern about the growth of the White Power movement within the United States. Beginning with his time spent at ICP in 2012, this project has taken him across the US to Georgia, Kentucky, Tennessee, Virginia, West Virginia, Texas, Ohio, and Arizona. The work concentrates on two different, but allying, groups- the Ku Klux Klan which is a homegrown group and the National Socialist Movement, the country’s largest Neo Nazi group.

Christian Picciolini is an Emmy® Award-winning television producer, a prolific public speaker, a published author, and a reformed extremist. His work and life purpose are born of an ongoing and profound need to atone for a grisly past, and to make something of his time on this planet by contributing to the greater good. After leaving the violent far-right hate movement he was part of during his youth, he began the painstaking process of rebuilding his life. Christian earned a degree in International Relations from DePaul University, began his own global entertainment media firm, and was appointed a member of the Chicago Grammy Rock Music Committee and board member for the Chicago Intl. Movies and Music Festival. Christian is displaying some objects related to his former skinhead life in this show.

Kara Jackson’s poetry explores the essence of invisibility, the authentic elements of language, and divine womanhood, along with its placement in the world. She was born in Oak Park, Illinois. As a young activist, she seeks to make women visible and end the violent language spoken between men and women around the world. Her upcoming charity work includes a Period Drive, which seeks to provide feminine products, underwear, and other necessities to homeless women. She is the winner of her sophomore class poetry slam, which included over a hundred students. She has received the Scholastic Art and Writing Award for her short story Nursery Rhymes, which won a silver medal at a national level. Jackson is a member of the Spoken Word club at Oak Park River Forest High school. She represented the school in the Louder Than a Bomb festival in 2016 and 2017. Her work is to be featured in the forthcoming book by Kevin Coval, The End of Chiraq. She recently released her first song Discomfort on Soundcloud.

Strange Fruit is the first documentary exploring the history and legacy of the Billie Holiday classic. The song's evolution tells a dramatic story of America's radical past using one of the most influential protest songs ever written as its epicenter. The saga brings viewers face- to- face with the terror of lynching even as it spotlights the courage and heroism of those who fought for racial justice when to do so was to risk ostracism and livelihood if white - and death if Black. It examines the history of lynching, and the interplay of race, labor and the left, and popular culture as forces that would give rise to the Civil Rights Movement.

Open by Appointment outside of receptions. For an appointment, please call 312 852 7717

August: Silent Sentinels No More! The 1917 Night of Terror and Women Unite Against Trump: Group Show - Women's Marches

September: Alison Jackson's Private- "Donald Trump" Photos. 1917 -2017: What is Today's "War for Democracy?” A second look at the Espionage Act

October: Cuba Si! Bloqueo No! Looking at the Revolution

November: Russian Revolution 100th Anniversary

December: Human Rights Day Show-The Chicago House Un-American Activities Hearings

January: 100 Years of Chicago Police Violence



100 Years: 1917 and 2017

The Rise of Hate

Looking at the work of the Equal Justice Initiative - Mapping Lynching in the USA and Remembering the Lynching of Ell Persons in 1917. Johnny Milano's Series “White Pride Worldwide” and Christian Picciolini, co-founder of Life After Hate and author of "Romantic Violence: Memoirs Of An American Skinhead", displays objects related to the white supremacist skinhead movement.

Opening: FRIDAY JULY 14, 6-10pm,
URI-EICHEN Gallery 2101 S Halsted
Chicago IL 60608

info@URI-EICHEN.com

Opening Reception: 7pm Reading with Christian Picciolini from "Romantic Violence.” 8pm: Music and Spoken Word with Kara Jackson

Closing Reception: August 3rd 7-9pm Film “Strange Fruit” Discussion panel on film and reading from Christian Picciolini

The Equal Justice Initiative is committed to ending mass incarceration and excessive punishment in the United States, to challenging racial and economic injustice, and to protecting basic human rights for the most vulnerable people in American society.

Ell Persons was lynched in 1917 in Memphis. It was reported at the time that thousands attended the lynching. We will remember Persons and discuss the work of the Equal Justice Initiative at this reception. Through the work of the EJI mapping lynching in America , 800 more victims of this terrorism have been discovered than were known before their research.

Milano’s White Power Worldwide grew out of concern about the growth of the White Power movement within the United States. Beginning with his time spent at ICP in 2012, this project has taken him across the US to Georgia, Kentucky, Tennessee, Virginia, West Virginia, Texas, Ohio, and Arizona. The work concentrates on two different, but allying, groups- the Ku Klux Klan which is a homegrown group and the National Socialist Movement, the country’s largest Neo Nazi group.

Christian Picciolini is an Emmy® Award-winning television producer, a prolific public speaker, a published author, and a reformed extremist. His work and life purpose are born of an ongoing and profound need to atone for a grisly past, and to make something of his time on this planet by contributing to the greater good. After leaving the violent far-right hate movement he was part of during his youth, he began the painstaking process of rebuilding his life. Christian earned a degree in International Relations from DePaul University, began his own global entertainment media firm, and was appointed a member of the Chicago Grammy Rock Music Committee and board member for the Chicago Intl. Movies and Music Festival. Christian is displaying some objects related to his former skinhead life in this show.

Kara Jackson’s poetry explores the essence of invisibility, the authentic elements of language, and divine womanhood, along with its placement in the world. She was born in Oak Park, Illinois. As a young activist, she seeks to make women visible and end the violent language spoken between men and women around the world. Her upcoming charity work includes a Period Drive, which seeks to provide feminine products, underwear, and other necessities to homeless women. She is the winner of her sophomore class poetry slam, which included over a hundred students. She has received the Scholastic Art and Writing Award for her short story Nursery Rhymes, which won a silver medal at a national level. Jackson is a member of the Spoken Word club at Oak Park River Forest High school. She represented the school in the Louder Than a Bomb festival in 2016 and 2017. Her work is to be featured in the forthcoming book by Kevin Coval, The End of Chiraq. She recently released her first song Discomfort on Soundcloud.

Strange Fruit is the first documentary exploring the history and legacy of the Billie Holiday classic. The song's evolution tells a dramatic story of America's radical past using one of the most influential protest songs ever written as its epicenter. The saga brings viewers face- to- face with the terror of lynching even as it spotlights the courage and heroism of those who fought for racial justice when to do so was to risk ostracism and livelihood if white - and death if Black. It examines the history of lynching, and the interplay of race, labor and the left, and popular culture as forces that would give rise to the Civil Rights Movement.

Open by Appointment outside of receptions. For an appointment, please call 312 852 7717

August: Silent Sentinels No More! The 1917 Night of Terror and Women Unite Against Trump: Group Show - Women's Marches

September: Alison Jackson's Private- "Donald Trump" Photos. 1917 -2017: What is Today's "War for Democracy?” A second look at the Espionage Act

October: Cuba Si! Bloqueo No! Looking at the Revolution

November: Russian Revolution 100th Anniversary

December: Human Rights Day Show-The Chicago House Un-American Activities Hearings

January: 100 Years of Chicago Police Violence



Series May through September: 100 Years: 1917 and 2017 Compelled: The Selective Service Act of 1917- War is Trauma, Celebrating People's History: Iraq Veterans Against the War - Ten Years of Fighting for Peace and Justice, and Aaron Hughes' Dust Memories

Uri-Eichen Gallery
2101 S Halsted Chicago 60608

Opening June 9th, 6-10pm Discussion 7pm: Counter Recruitment work in CPS and other schools of Pat Hunt of NorthWest Suburban Peace & Education Project and Arny Stieber and Frank Fitzgerald of Chicago Chapter of Vets for Peace

Open by appointment through July 7. For an Appointment call 312 852 7717

About the show:

War Is Trauma is a portfolio of handmade prints produced by the Justseeds Artists' Cooperative in collaboration with the Iraq Veterans Against the War (IVAW). This portfolio transpired out of a street poster project, from November 2010, which a number of Justseeds artists provided graphics for "Operation Recovery" - a campaign to stop the deployment of traumatized troops and win service members and veterans right to heal. Posters were pasted in public, replacing many corporate advertisements, to focus public attention towards the issues not being discussed - GI Resistance, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), sexual assault in the military or Military Sexual Trauma (MST), and Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI). For this project over 30 artists from Justseeds, IVAW, and our allies have each created a print that addresses “Operation Recovery,” its larger goals of supporting service member and veterans right to heal, GI resistance, challenging the culture of militarism in the US, and ending the war in Afghanistan. A total of 130 portfolios have been created that we hope inspire 130 exhibitions that can act as a starting point to bring different people together – veterans, civilians, Iraqis, Afghans, and others to dialogue on issues.

'Celebrate People's History: Iraq Veterans Against the War - Ten Years of Fighting for Justice and Peace' is a portfolio poster project honoring IVAW's ten year history of speaking out against the wars and taking action to bring home the impact of these wars. The portfolio features contributions from IVAW members, Justseeds Artists' Cooperative members, along with allied veterans, artists and writers. It highlights key ideas, moments, projects, tactics and individuals from IVAW history in order to uplift IVAW's ongoing struggle, inspire others to take action, and preserve a snapshot of movement history.

Aaron Hughes’ Dust Memories: Dust Memories is a series of drawings, paintings, and collages that communicate the ambiguous and anxious moments of his deployment with the 1244th Transportation Company in support of combat operations in Iraq in 2003 and 2004. In 2008, a series of ten artist books were produced. The hand bound accordion book and it’s cyclical structure was conceived as a metaphor for continually repeating memories of his deployment, as well as representing the reality that this journey in many ways is still being carried out. The book was made with a generous grant from Booklyn Arts and has been collected by many private and public collections. Public Collections: Clark Arts Institute, Lafayette College, Library of Congress, Pritzker Military Library, Stanford University, University of California Irvine, University of Connecticut, and Yale University. Aaron Hughes is an artist, activist, organizer, teacher, and Iraq War veteran based in Chicago.

About Just Seeds: With members working from the U.S., Canada, and Mexico, Justseeds operates both as a unified collaboration of similarly minded printmakers and as a loose collection of creative individuals with unique viewpoints and working methods. We believe in the transformative power of personal expression in concert with collective action. To this end, we produce collective portfolios, contribute graphics to grassroots struggles for justice, work collaboratively both in- and outside the co-op, build large sculptural installations in galleries, and wheatpaste on the streets—all while offering each other daily support as allies and friends.

About the discussion 6-9 at 7pm:

Chicago Chapter of Veterans For Peace: Arny Stieber - MBA, Retired CEO, Coordinator of the Chicago Chapter of Veterans For Peace. Moved the Chapter to focus on the de-militarization of CPS as the main project. Army, infantry in the U.S. war against the people of Viet Nam.

Frank Fitzgerald - Professor of Sociology at College of St. Rose in Albany, NY. B.A., Loyola University; M.A., New School for Social Research; Ph.D., The State University of New York at Binghamton. Associate (non-veteran) member of Veterans For Peace. Developed a video and web site on de-militarizing CPS - http://EducationNotMilitarization.org. Headed up a fund raising initiative to place de-militarization billboards around the city.

Pat Hunt joined NorthWest Suburban Peace & Education Project in the fall of 2004. The group had just started counter-recruiting in all 6 high schools in District 214. This district is in the northwest suburbs of Chicago (hence the group’s name!) and includes Elk Grove H.S., Buffalo Grove H.S., Rolling Meadows H.S., Prospect H.S., Wheeling H.S., and Hersey H.S. We go to each high school once a month, set up a table, put out information that students can take home, and talk to students about options after high school other than the military. ¬¬¬We have also branched out from just counter-recruiting to issues of peace and social justice. We have hosted community forums, film screenings, and vigils that go right to the heart of peace and social justice.



For Other Purposes: a Retrospective of 40 Years of Posters from Chicago's Salsedo Press

Opening: FRIDAY MAY 12, 6-10pm, URI-EICHEN Gallery 2101 S Halsted, Chicago IL 60608
info@URI-EICHEN.com | www.uri-eichen.com

Receptions: Thursday May 18, 25, and June 1 -Open 7-9pm

For Appointment outside of receptions until June 2: call 312 852 7717

One hundred years ago, in 1917, Congress passed the Espionage Act, just two months after the US entered World War I. All laws passed by the US government are assigned two names. The shorter one is merely intended to provide a convenient name for referring to it; the longer one to provide a description of the purpose or scope of the legislation. As its name indicates the Espionage Act was designed to arrest and prosecute spies. The official longer title reveals much more about how the law was used to discourage dissent not only the war, but to any government policy: An Act to punish acts of interference with the foreign relations, and the foreign commerce of the United States, to punish espionage, and better to enforce the criminal laws of the United States, and for other purposes.

The wording of the Espionage Act left a great deal of room for aggressive prosecutors and overzealous patriots to interpret it as they wished. Things got worse the next year when Congress passed more draconian amendments to the Act that outlawed statements during war that were "disloyal, profane, scurrilous, or abusive … about the form of government of the United States." Among those charged with offenses under the Act were socialist labor leader and four-time US presidential candidate Eugene V. Debs and anarchist activists Emma Goldman and Alexander Berkman. The 1919 [Atty. Gen. A. Mitchell ] Palmer Raids, targeting Communist and Anarchist immigrants, used the powers of the Act as justification for arrests leading to deportations. . In June of 1919, Attorney General A. Mitchell Palmer's home was bombed and, a year later, the headquarters of the JP Morgan bank on Wall Street. Although neither was related to the war, the Espionage Act's longer description kicked in "better to enforce the criminal laws of the United States, and for other purposes."

In the interest of those "other purposes", the investigation of the bombings led to the arrest and subsequent death while in police custody of Andreo Salsedo, the anarchist printer whose name Salsedo Press took 40 years ago. Uri-Eichen joins the progressive community of Chicago in celebrating Salsedo Press with a retrospective of posters called "For Other Purposes". [The Espionage Act is still intact. It was invoked in the cases of Daniel Ellsberg 1971 release of the Pentagon Papers and more recently against Chelsea Manning and Edward Snowden for their roles in making government documents available to to the public.]



Film Screening, Discussion and Closing Reception For Other Purposes

Opening: FRIDAY MAY 12, 6-10pm, URI-EICHEN Gallery 2101 S Halsted, Chicago IL 60608
info@URI-EICHEN.com | www.uri-eichen.com

Film: 7pm Sacco and Vanzetti

June 1, 7-9pm

Leading the post-screening discussion, Lionel Bottari will draw on his deep Italian roots, his work as a storyteller, musician and puppeteer, as well as his trade union experience as a third-generation member of the IWW - Industrial Workers of the World. The Wobblies organized strikes in support of Sacco and Vanzetti before their wrongful conviction and execution.

For Appointment outside of receptions until June 2: call 312 852 7717

Salsedo Press was named for Andrea Salsedo, an Italian-born anarchist printer who was arrested in the Spring of 1920 and held for 8 weeks, before being thrown from a 14th floor window of the US Justice Department's Bureau of Investigations in NYC..

Two days later, two men who knew Salsedo were arrested in Braintree, MA for robbery and murder - Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti.

Sacco and Vanzetti, a 2006 documentary by Peter Miller tells of thecase that came to symbolize the bigotry and intolerance directed at immigrants and dissenters in America. Millions of people around the world protested on their behalf, and now, 90 years later, their story continues to have great resonance, as civil liberties and the rights of immigrants are again under attack.

Powerful prison writings (given voice by John Turturro and Tony Shalhoub) and passionate interviews with Howard Zinn, Arlo Guthrie and Studs Terkel are interwoven with artwork, music, and film clips. Through the story of Sacco and Vanzetti, audiences will experience a universal - and very timely - tale of official injustice and human resilience.

Join us a Uri-Eichen Gallery for the film, a discussion and the closing reception for the first in our five month series "100 Years - 1917 to 2017". May's exhibit is For Other Purposes: The Espionage Act of 1917 and a 40 Year Retrospective of the Posters of Salsedo Press.


One hundred years ago, in 1917, Congress passed the Espionage Act, just two months after the US entered World War I. All laws passed by the US government are assigned two names. The shorter one is merely intended to provide a convenient name for referring to it; the longer one to provide a description of the purpose or scope of the legislation. As its name indicates the Espionage Act was designed to arrest and prosecute spies. The official longer title reveals much more about how the law was used to discourage dissent not only the war, but to any government policy: An Act to punish acts of interference with the foreign relations, and the foreign commerce of the United States, to punish espionage, and better to enforce the criminal laws of the United States, and for other purposes.

The wording of the Espionage Act left a great deal of room for aggressive prosecutors and overzealous patriots to interpret it as they wished. Things got worse the next year when Congress passed more draconian amendments to the Act that outlawed statements during war that were "disloyal, profane, scurrilous, or abusive … about the form of government of the United States." Among those charged with offenses under the Act were socialist labor leader and four-time US presidential candidate Eugene V. Debs and anarchist activists Emma Goldman and Alexander Berkman. The 1919 [Atty. Gen. A. Mitchell ] Palmer Raids, targeting Communist and Anarchist immigrants, used the powers of the Act as justification for arrests leading to deportations. . In June of 1919, Attorney General A. Mitchell Palmer's home was bombed and, a year later, the headquarters of the JP Morgan bank on Wall Street. Although neither was related to the war, the Espionage Act's longer description kicked in "better to enforce the criminal laws of the United States, and for other purposes."

In the interest of those "other purposes", the investigation of the bombings led to the arrest and subsequent death while in police custody of Andreo Salsedo, the anarchist printer whose name Salsedo Press took 40 years ago. Uri-Eichen joins the progressive community of Chicago in celebrating Salsedo Press with a retrospective of posters called "For Other Purposes". [The Espionage Act is still intact. It was invoked in the cases of Daniel Ellsberg 1971 release of the Pentagon Papers and more recently against Chelsea Manning and Edward Snowden for their roles in making government documents available to to the public.]



“NO”: Igniting Oppositional Consciousness

Opening – Friday, April 14, 6-10pm, URI-EICHEN Gallery 2101 S Halsted, Chicago IL 60608
info@URI-EICHEN.com | www.uri-eichen.com

As uncertainty strains on our daily lives, voices from various backgrounds stand together in “NO”: Igniting Oppositional Consciousness, a show in response and in opposition to the global political right wing shift.
No is curated by student artists at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (SAIC) in the course titled Social Movements from a Global Perspective, which attempts to define what it means to be a part of a “movement” in its entirety. This exploration is facilitated via classroom visitors imparting first-hand accounts, documentary narratives, and active dialogue. While the syllabus focuses largely on the social justice movements of 20–21st century North and South America, it is motivated, above all, by a general probing of the connections that tie successfully driven movements together. Topics of discourse have ranged from immigration and labor laws to the rights of indigenous peoples. This show confronts what it means to be an artist activist in today’s social climate, beyond the attendance of a protest. With the recent surge in protest as a response to uprisings of oppression, having this stage upon which to contribute intersectional activism is both essential and eye-opening. Students have produced and curated provocative works to further expose the course’s discourse to the outside world. Both within the classroom and on the walls of the gallery, the exhibition examines the crucial connections between creativity and resistance.

Group Show:, Ally Berkowitz ,­­­­Noa Billick, Morgan Bussy, Kristine Dalbey, Nicole Demczuk, Eric Garcia, Josselyn Garcia, Angeline Sofia Holt, Shannon Jarhling, Hellen Jo, Farnaz Khosh-Sirat, Maria Louisa, Joseph Josue Mora, Noëlle Pouzar, Navi Schiff, Ona Sian, Aram Han Sifuentes, Joanna Sit, Annie Rose Soler, Lindsay Stewart, Michaela Vaughan, Lisa Vinebaum, Thaib A. Wahab

April 14: Program 7pm

Shannon Jarhling: Speaking about the SAIC Social Movements from a Global Perspective class that organized the show and how the artist-students have been questioning their role in social activism and social change.

Noa Billick: Speaking about her curatorial role in the show, discusses the exhibit, and reflects on the students’ concerns, core values and involvement in social change activism.

SAIC Professor Ruth Needleman: Q and A

Performance: (approximately 730pm) A Witness: In All Probability - Performance by Maria Luisa and Erin Delany, SAIC. The performance discusses the United State’s dismissal of past atrocities it has committed as a nation to both Native American people and the earth as a whole and it's refusal to acknowledge and learn from it's violent history. The performance incorporates legal documents specific to the dealings between the U.S. and the Sioux nation, spanning from the Blackhill treaty in 1868 to present day cease and desist orders surrounding DAPL. The romanticism, reliance and abuse of the earth acknowledges our inescapable complicity in our own demise

Live Music: Plus Sign, Half Awake, and Shark Fangs + (Plus Sign) is President of the World; a rapper, educator, writer, and community organizer who likes to play a lot of games on his way to granting eternal life to our planet! His work can be found at tenderdiscovery.com


InJustice for All Film Festival
If These Walls Could Talk

Film and Reception with the filmmaker, Julian Hamer
Friday, April 28th 6pm -10pm
Film at 7pm


A documentary examining the Sandtown Mural Project in Baltimore and its impact in the Sandtown-Winchester community following the unrest and uprising due to the death of Freddie Gray in police custody on April 19, 2015. The Sandtown Mural Project features a group of 10 local artists creating works of art curated by Ernest Shaw and Nether. Walls were painted during October 2015 through December 2015

Discussion- after the film: public art's role in political action

After Freddie Gray unrest, activists hope to transform Sandtown-Winchester with murals, gardens

A Sandtown mural project is torn over the meaning of the American flag

Series May through September: 100 Years: 1917 and 2017

For Other Purposes: a Retrospective of 40 Years of Posters from Chicago's Salsedo Press

A first look at the Espionage Act of 1917

Opening: FRIDAY MAY 12, 6-10pm
Receptions: Thursday May 18, 25, and June 1 -Open 7-9pm
For Appointment outside of receptions until June 2: call 312 852 7717

June: Compelled: The Selective Service Act of 1917- War is Trauma, Celebrating People's History: Iraq Veterans Against the War - Ten Years of Fighting for Peace and Justice, and Aaron Hughes' Dust Memories

July: The Rise of Hate: Johnny Milano's Series “White Pride Worldwide”, Christian Picciolini, and the Work of the Equal Justice Initiative - Mapping Lynching in the USA.

August: Silent Sentinels No More! The 1917 Night of Terror and Women Unite Against Trump: Group Show - Women's Marches

September: Alison Jackson's Private- "Donald Trump" Photos. 1917 -2017: What is Today's "War for Democracy?" A second look at the Espionage Act

October: Cuba Si! Bloqueo No! Looking at the Revolution

November: Russian Revolution 100th Anniversary

December: Human Rights Day Show-The Chicago House Un-American Activities Hearings

January: 100 Years of Chicago Police Violence

Open by appointment through May 5, Call for an appointment 312 852 7717




Semblance of Order

Opening – Friday, March 10, 6-10pm

Open by appointment through April 7
Call for an appointment 312 852 7717

URI-EICHEN Gallery 2101 S Halsted, Chicago IL 60608
info@URI-EICHEN.com | www.uri-eichen.com

Semblance of Order presents new work by artists Michael Rado, Frances Lightbound and Louis Kishfy in response to designed objects in urban spaces that reinforce real and perceived security. Building upon research into defensive architecture in Chicago from the group’s previous collaborative project, Semblance of Order sets the haphazard against the highly-designed, prodding at the material systems of safety, prevention and (over)protection. It is through these concrete material systems that the group intends to dismantle and reconfigure abstract perceptions of authority, ownership and otherness.

Photograph taken by Michael Rado, Frances Lightbound and Louis Kishfy; Chicago Loop; 2015.

Topographies of Defense (2015-2016) was a project led by Michael Rado, Louis Kishfy and Frances Lightbound which examined design in the urban sphere whose primary function is to discourage, rather than facilitate, human usage. Elements such as homeless spikes, decorative security facades, anti-skate rails, bollards, benches, planters and landscaping elements all contribute to a covertly defensive reconfiguration of public space. With a focused lens on Chicago, the project comprised an online photographic archive, an introduction during Sullivan Galleries’ exhibition Outside Design and culminated with a public symposium and gallery exhibition held at the LeRoy Neiman Center in Chicago.

Michael Rado is originally from the suburbs of Columbus, Ohio, and currently lives and works in New York City. Rado’s interdisciplinary work spans sculpture, installation, and video, and critically celebrates the spirit of his middle-class heritage, prodding at themes of privilege, privacy, and sovereignty. He earned his MFA in Studio from the School of Art institute of Chicago (2016), and BFA from the University of Michigan (2009). Rado’s recent work has been exhibited at a range of venues in Chicago, notably at EXPO Chicago (2016), Pulaski Park with Fieldwork Collaborative Projects, and at Edra Soto and Dan Sullivan’s East Garfield Park gallery, The Franklin. Along with Lightbound, he is a fellow in the 2016-2017 Field Trip / Field Notes / Field Guide fellowship.

Frances Lightbound is an artist based between Chicago and Glasgow, having earned her MFA from SAIC (2016) and a BA (Hons) from Glasgow School of Art (2012). Working primarily in printmaking, sculpture, and installation, her work examines symbolism and authority in the built environment and issues relating to the division of space and property. She is a current HATCH artist resident at Chicago Artists Coalition, and a participant in the 2016-2017 Field Trip / Field Notes / Field Guide fellowship.

Louis Kishfy is a technologist who currently lives and works in Rhode Island. Kishfy’s practice is rooted predominantly in sculpture and installation; exploring his interests in sociology, postmodern philosophy, and environmental psychology. He is a graduate of the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (MDes, 2016) and the University of Rhode Island (BS, 2012).


Photographs by Danielle Dolan and Thomas Kiefer

Immigrants and the American Dream
Including part of the El Sueno Americano Series from Thomas Kiefer/INSTITUTE

Opening – Friday, February 10, 6-10pm

Discussion 730pm
Live Music 8pm: Linda Boyle and Jesus Azteca Sanchez

Open by appointment through March 3rd
Call for an appointment 312 852 7717

URI-EICHEN Gallery 2101 S Halsted, Chicago IL 60608

Danielle Dolan is a fine art photographer who has lived in the Belmont-Cragin neighborhood on Chicago’s northwest side since 2013. She studied photography at the University of Missouri, Harrington College of Design, and Columbia College Chicago, where she graduated with her Bachelor’s in 2016. Living in Belmont-Cragin in the same household as Mexican immigrants exposed her to the reality of what it means to be an immigrant living in the United States today.

After hearing countless stories from her boyfriend’s family members, she learned that many risked their lives to travel thousands of miles, sometimes without food or water, in order to get to the States. All of their belongings and ties to home were left behind in pursuit of greater opportunities that were not available to them in Mexico. Upon arrival to the States, they were met with greater obstacles, oppression, and systemic racism. Still, despite their hardships, they will each say their sacrifice was worth it.

“Immigrants” aims to capture a fleeting emotion in each subject after they recount their experience crossing the Mexico-US border, or recall the journeys that their loved ones have endured. Small excerpts from each interview are included with the portraits so that the viewer may gain some insight on what each experience entailed. Each story in the series is connected with the same underlying theme of chasing the American Dream. They range from tales of terror to childish delight. She hopes the viewers are able to see through the eyes of those who have lived through it all, even if they are only allowed a glimpse

Tom Kiefer: El Sueno Americano- Working as a janitor from July 2003 until August 2014 I was greatly disturbed by the volume of food, clothing and personal belongings thrown away at a single U.S. Customs and Border Patrol facility. For many of those years, I was allowed to collect and take the food transported by migrants, that was discarded during the first stages of processing, to our community food bank, an estimated sixty tons by the person who managed it.

The personal effects and belongings were another matter: Why would someone throw away a rosary or bible? Why would someone throw away a wallet? Why would a pair of shoes, for all intents and purpose “brand new”, be tossed in the trash?

The ideals upon which this country was founded seem to be under attack as never before, two hundred and thirty nine years since we declared ourselves a nation. “The beacon of hope”, fairness, democracy, equality, faith and grace seems more and more like a sales gimmick, limited to certain groups of people.

How we treat others is a reflection of who we are. When belts, shoelaces, toothbrushes, socks, shoes, underwear, pants, shirts, jackets, watches, bibles, wallets, coins, cell phones, keys, jewelry, calling-cards, water, food, soap, deodorant, gloves, medicine, birth control pills, blankets and rosaries are considered non-essential personal property and discarded, regardless of the amount and origin, something becomes less than human­­

There is something inherently disturbing behind many of the images presented in El Sueno Americano Project that defies logical and rational explanation: Why was all this thrown away?

Linda Boyle: Singer, song writer and social historian Linda Boyle has been performing for decades. She sings in many languages and genres, with a vast repertoire in Spanish, as well as well-researched songs.

Linda has been a educator for over thirty years, teaching grades 4-12 as well as Adult Education and English as a Second Language. She has taught Reading, U.S. History, Chicago Studies, and specializes in the history of women, labor, immigrants, and peace and social justice movements. In her twenty-five years in Special Education, she has had roles as both a teacher and school director. Her workshops include the use of music in differentiated and literacy instruction, and as an expressive therapy in working with youth who have experienced trauma and abuse.




Michael Gaylord James • Onward!

Onward: Movements, Activists, Politics and Politicians
Closing Reception • 6-10 PM • Friday • February 3, 2017

January 13 – February 3, 2017

URI-EICHEN Gallery 2101 S Halsted, Chicago IL 60608
info@URI-EICHEN.com | www.uri-eichen.com

michaelgaylordjames.com

Photographer and activist Michael James presents a new selection of photos, to start the New Year with a positive vision. James believes “the struggle for social and political change is a long one—always and forever, with plenty of ups and downs. Now is a time in our history when we need to do a lot of progressive organizing.”

His new show Onward: Movements, Activists, Politics, and Politicians 1962 - 2015 is at the Uri Eichen Gallery from January 13th through February 3. James’s photos remind us of much that has transpired over the years, and hopefully encourage us to continue onward, going forward on a positive path in the quest for a just and better world.

The exhibit includes a selection of James’s photos taken over a 54-year span. His memories of the situations and circumstances he captured accompany the photos.

Included in the Exhibit are:

President Kennedy in Mexico, participants in the Berkeley Free Speech Movement, Governor Kerner on the stump in Peoria, SNCC and SDS organizers in alley conversation, the 20th Anniversary of the March on Washington, Sandinista soldiers, Roman Pucinski and Jesse Jackson at Harold Washington’s inauguration, Anarchist Cheerleaders on May Day, Katy Hogan and Dennis Kucinich at the Heartland Café, Obama at the Heartland and at Chicago State, Quinn under fire from AFSCME at the Illinois State Fair, the Chuy Garcia campaign and Black Lives Matters.

Call for an appointment 312 852-7717




Revolutionary Poets Brigade: Overthrowing Capitalism (Vol. 3)

Sunday, January 29 at 5 PM - 8 PM

URI-EICHEN Gallery 2101 S Halsted, Chicago IL 60608
info@URI-EICHEN.com | www.uri-eichen.com

For the third time, we are overthrowing capitalism! (Who knew it would take more than two volumes of poetry?!) Please join the Chicago Revolutionary Poets Brigade (#RPBchi) and friends for what promises to be a fun but unflinching night of real-talk featuring not just poems from the new international anthology published by the San Francisco RPB (including some of our own members), but also performances from some of the brave poets we have worked with over the last three years! In the spirit of this volume's subtitle, "Reclaiming Community," we are structuring the event in order to emphasize not so much the book itself (although we will be proudly selling the newly released copies!) but the wonderful web of culture we are woven into as revolutionary poets and organizations in Chicago!

Keep your eyes on the list of performers as it is officially released here over the next few weeks!

Hope you can come!
*Hasta La Victoria Siempre*
-Adam G (on behalf of the RPBchi)

Featured Performers:
- Lew Rosenbaum
- Diana Zwinak
- Poets from the Harlan Academy Louder Than A Bomb Team
- Heather Byrd Roberts (from Young Chicago Authors)
- Eric Allen Yankee
- RJ El (from Young Chicago Authors)
- Elizabeth Marino
- Lisa Wagner (from the Guild Complex)
- Adam Gottlieb
- Poetic Taee

- Call for an appointment 312 852-7717




Michael Gaylord James • Onward!

Onward: Movements, Activists, Politics and Politicians

Opening Reception • 6-10 PM • Friday • January 13, 2017
Closing Reception • 6-10 PM • Friday • February 3, 2017

January 13 – February 3, 2017

URI-EICHEN Gallery 2101 S Halsted, Chicago IL 60608
info@URI-EICHEN.com | www.uri-eichen.com

michaelgaylordjames.com

Photographer and activist Michael James presents a new selection of photos, to start the New Year with a positive vision. James believes “the struggle for social and political change is a long one—always and forever, with plenty of ups and downs. Now is a time in our history when we need to do a lot of progressive organizing.”

His new show Onward: Movements, Activists, Politics, and Politicians 1962 - 2015 is at the Uri Eichen Gallery from January 13th through February 3. James’s photos remind us of much that has transpired over the years, and hopefully encourage us to continue onward, going forward on a positive path in the quest for a just and better world.

The exhibit includes a selection of James’s photos taken over a 54-year span. His memories of the situations and circumstances he captured accompany the photos.

Included in the Exhibit are:

President Kennedy in Mexico, participants in the Berkeley Free Speech Movement, Governor Kerner on the stump in Peoria, SNCC and SDS organizers in alley conversation, the 20th Anniversary of the March on Washington, Sandinista soldiers, Roman Pucinski and Jesse Jackson at Harold Washington’s inauguration, Anarchist Cheerleaders on May Day, Katy Hogan and Dennis Kucinich at the Heartland Café, Obama at the Heartland and at Chicago State, Quinn under fire from AFSCME at the Illinois State Fair, the Chuy Garcia campaign and Black Lives Matters.

Call for an appointment 312 852-7717




A Voice For Victims

Drawings by Kathy Weaver with Photos by Dr. Zaher Sahloul
Opening Reception: Friday, December 9, 6pm to 10pm

URI-EICHEN Gallery 2101 S Halsted, Chicago IL 60608
info@URI-EICHEN.com | www.uri-eichen.com

Dr. Zaher Sahloul and Kathy Weaver speaking at 7:30


Show Dates: December 9– January 6, 2017
Gallery Hours:please call 312 852-7717 for an appointment.
Free and Open to the Public
Contact:Kathy Steichen gabbyfish@hotmail.com

Uri-Eichen Gallery presents our 5th Annual Human Rights Day Show “A Voice for Victims: Drawings by Kathy Weaver with Photos by Dr. Zaher Sahloul”, an exhibition featuring the work of Kathy Weaver and photographs of Syria by Dr. Zaher Sahloul.Dr. Sahloul is a Chicago-area critical care specialist who heads the Syrian American Medical Society, a non-profit humanitarian organization established in 2007.

Weaver’s drawings address components of war and in particular, the plight of war victims in Syria. Dr. Sahloul’s photos show the devastation he witnessed on several trips to administer to patients in the underground hospitals of Aleppo.Weaver’s work with issues of war and Dr. Sahloul’s community activism combine to bring their unique views to a show of narrative works that address conflict in today’s world.

Weaver’s large-scale drawings series “War Devours Us” show the toll of violent confrontation and explore the effects of war on soldiers and civilians.Tonal qualities of the drawing highlight the newsreel-like action. The interplay between hard edge airbrushed areas and expressive charcoal lines emphasizes the discrepancy be­tween the inhumanity of violent destruction and death and the humanity of those refugees and victims who persist and endure in the events of war.

Dr. Sahloul is the immediate past president of and a senior advisor to the Syrian American Medical Society (SAMS), a humanitarian and advocacy organization that provides medical relief to Syrians and Syrian refugees. Dr. Sahloul is also the founder of the American Relief Coalition for Syria, a coalition of 14 US-based humanitarian organizations working in Syria. Dr. Sahloul risks his life to travel to work in the underground hospitals in Aleppo so he can bear witness and be a voice for the victims. The photographs on view are from his recent medical mission trips to Aleppo. They attest to the tragedy that keeps unfolding in Syria and also to the forbearance of those who remain there.

The exhibitors hope the images will help people remember the suffering of war especially that of the children of Syria. Weaver and Sahloul refuse to accept that what is going on in Syria is normal.




Kembrew’s Critique Boutique

Opening - November 11, 6-10pm

URI-EICHEN Gallery 2101 S Halsted, Chicago IL 60608
Screening of Copyright Criminals and Artist Discussion 730pm

Open by appointment through December 2. For an appointment call 312 852 7717

Kembrew’s Critique Boutique, hosted by the Uri-Eichen Gallery in Chicago, is your one-stop outlet for serious fun. This gallery show features solo and collaborative work by Kembrew McLeod, a media scholar and artist whose projects cross several mediums and practices. His multimedia, multimodal body of work explores how dissent can seep through the cracks of the popular culture that provides our lingua franca, a language that is often privatized and fenced off by intellectual property laws. This was underscored in his 1998 piece, Freedom of Expression®, when Kembrew trademarked that iconic phrase and later threatened AT&T with legal action for “using freedom of expression without permission” in an ad. This conceptual pop-up shop showcases an interconnected oeuvre that includes books, zines and other print ephemera, as well as documentaries, audio projects, and politically-charged “pranks” — such as Freedom of Expression®, selling Kembrew’s Soul, and the exploits of his intrepid alter ego, RoboProfessor (who has crossed paths with Bill Clinton, Michele Bachman and others).

Bio: Kembrew McLeod is a Professor of Communication Studies at the University of Iowa. He has published and produced several books, documentaries, and other award-winning work.

Open by appointment through December 2. Call for an appointment 312 852 7717




Pilsen Open Studios Openings:

Saturday, October 22 Noon to 10pm and

Sunday, October 23, Noon to 6pm


Uri-Eichen Gallery 2101 S Halsted Chicago IL

Saturday, October 22, 7pm Screening:

THE BEST DEMOCRACY MONEY CAN BUY
A Tale Of Billionaires And Ballot Bandits

The film reveals how nearly one million minority voters can lose their vote this November.

When Donald Trump says, "This election is rigged"—he should know. His buddies are rigging it.

Rolling Stone investigative reporter Greg Palast busted Jeb Bush for stealing the 2000 election by purging Black voters from Florida’s electoral rolls. Now Palast is back to take a deep dive into the Republicans’ dark operation, Crosscheck, designed to steal a million votes by November.

Crosscheck is controlled by a Trump henchman, Kris Kobach, Kansas Secretary of State who claims his computer program has identified 7.2 million people in 29 states who may have voted twice in the same election--a felony crime. The catch? Most of these ‘suspects’ are minorities—in other words, mainly Democratic voters. Yet the lists and the evidence remain “confidential.”

Palast and his investigative partner Leni Badpenny do what it takes to get their hands on the data, analyzing it to find the names of nearly one million Americans about to lose their vote by November.

They hunt down and confront Kobach with the evidence of his "lynching by laptop." Then they are off to find the billionaires behind this voting scam. The search takes Palast from Kansas to the Arctic, the Congo, and to a swanky Hamptons dinner party held by Trump’s sugar-daddy, John Paulson, a.k.a. "JP The Foreclosure King." Palast and Badpenny stake out top GOP donors, the billionaire known as "The Vulture" and the Koch brothers, whom Palast nails with a damning tape recording.

In this real life detective story brought to life in a film noir style with cartoon animation, secret documents, hidden cameras, and a little help from Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Detectives Ice-T and Richard Belzer, Shailene Woodley, Rosario Dawson, Willie Nelson and Ed Asner, Palast and his associates expose the darkest plans of the uber-rich to steal America’s democracy.

Open by appointment through November 4. Call for an appointment 312 852 7717

October: The Election

Monoprints by: Jeff Kinzel, Doug Ruschhaupt, Kathy Steichen,
and Christopher Urias


Uri-Eichen Gallery 2101 S Halsted Chicago IL
Opening Reception – October 14, 6-10pm

Special Guest Rick Perlstein -730pm: Discussion: the Election! What Trump means to the Republican Party: what happens if he loses, and what happens if he wins. About the battle between Clinton and Sanders and what that will mean for the future of the Democratic Party

Rick Perlstein is the author of three best-selling and prize-winning histories of the American right and is working on a fourth. He contributes journalism to publications including Esquire, the New Republic, and the Nation.

Jeff Kinzel has been working with the medium of foil for more than twenty years. Born and raised in New York, he pursued his initial art studies at the Art Students League and the National Academy, also working as a studio assistant to painter Ellsworth Kelly. Later, he undertook graduate art studies at the University of Iowa. Kinzel’s paintings and foil works have been exhibited in solo and group shows abroad as well as in New York, Iowa, and North Carolina, where he now lives and works. He has taught extensively, both in the public-school system and as an independent arts educator, and today runs a small school based on an organic farm in Western North Carolina.

Douglas Ruschhaupt works in Milwaukee, WI and was a student of sculptor Julius Schmidt and Virginia Meyers at the University of Iowa

Kathy Steichen co-founded Uri-Eichen Gallery with her husband, Christopher Urias, in 2011. She has led the programming development and coordination of over 100 visual art and community events at the gallery in the last 4 years. She is a graduate of the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and has a M.S. in Union Leadership and Administration from UMASS Amherst. She has worked in the labor movement for more than 18 years as an organizer and union staff representative where she represents private and public sector local unions. She has been a practicing print-maker for over 25 years focused on work related to social justice themes.

Christopher Urias co-founded Uri-Eichen Gallery. He is a Pilsen, Chicago native who graduated from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago focused on printmaking.





We Want Freedom Closing Reception

October 7
6pm-10pm
730pm Discussion

The exhibition's closing night discussion will focus on criminal justice and the police. Original Rainbow Coalition members will speak of their experiences with the Chicago Police Department and FBI, including the harassment, brutality and infiltration that plagued not only the political organizations but the communities they served. Frank Chapman and panelists will compare today's movement to stop police violence with community control, citizen oversight or even abolition.

The discussion will be moderated by Peter Kuttner, Rising Up Angry Free Legal Program (1970), The End of the Nightstick: Confronting Police Brutality in Chicago (1993) filmmaker [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WTthOb1DXmM] and the [In]justice For All Film Festival (2017) co-director of programming [http://www.injusticeforallff.com/].




We Want Freedom Film Festival- See the exhibit and see these films!


Saturday October 1, 4pm-630pm:

PROGRAM #1
Troublemakers [1966 | 56 minutes | Norm Fruchter/Robert Machover A documentary about the organization of New Left. In the film, Tom Hayden and a group of students from the Students for a Democratic Society movement are being followed. In 1965 they went to Newark to set up the Newark Community Union Project together with its black community. This film deals with the problems the (white) organizers were confronted with while making an attempt to improve the living conditions of the (black) population. Troublemakers was the first documentary ever to be shown at the prestigious New York Film Festival.

We Got To Live Here [1965 | 20 Minutes | Robert Machover/Norm Fruchter. A portrait of the Black community of Clinton Hill in Newark, NJ. Roughly edited silent footage shot on the streets of the neighborhood was shown to people who lived there and their comments were recorded, along with music and talk taken from local radio, to create the sound track . Films start at 430pm. Post-screening discussion with Peter Kuttner, exhibit curator and filmmaker


Saturday October 1, 630pm-9pm

PROGRAM #2

The Democratic Promise: Saul Alinsky & His Legacy [1999 | 57min | Bob Hercule/Bruce Orenstein] The story of ordinary people making demands for the power to govern their own lives. Narrated by Alec Baldwin, the documentary examines both the history of community organizing — through the work of Saul Alinsky — as well as the current state of community organizing, as shown by contemporary organizations in New York and Texas. In a larger sense, the program is about the restoration of American democracy through shared public participation in civil life — a vital antidote to an era of increased citizen alienation and voter apathy.

Power to the People [1989 | 26 minutes | December 4th Committee] This film, made on the 20th anniversary of the assassination of Black Panther Fred Hampton speaks to Black, Latino and White activists who worked with and were influenced by Fred Hampton and the Illinois Black Panther Party. They recall the late 1960s and how the Panther experience still affects their current community work. In doing so, they tell the story of the IL Party and the murder and how it led to the empowerment of Chicago's African-American communities and the election of Chicago's first black mayor, Harold Washington, in 1983. Films start at 7pm. Post-screening discussion with Peter Kuttner, exhibit curator and filmmaker


Sunday October 2, 3pm-6pm

PROGRAM #3

American Revolution 2 [1969 | 76 minutes | Mike Gray/Howard Alk] A gritty but essential documentary charting social turbulences in late 1960's Chicago. American Revolution 2 includes footage of the 1968 Democratic Convention protest and riot, a critique of the events by working class African-Americans in Chicago, and attempts by the Black Panther Party to organize poor, southern white youths of the Young Patriot Party on the city's north side. Using direct sound, a handheld camera, no script, black-and-white film stock, and natural lighting, the directors' no-frills approach appropriately reflects the raw energy of this upheaval.

Trick Bag [1974 | 21 minutes | Kartemquin,/Rising Up Angry] White gang members, Vietnam vets, and young factory workers from Chicago's neighborhoods tell of their personal experience with racism: who gets hurt and who profits. Restored in 2011 thanks to a prestigious National Film Preservation Foundation grant. Films start at 330pm. Post-screening discussion with Peter Kuttner, exhibit curator and filmmaker


Sunday October 2 6-9pm

PROGRAM #4

The Murder of Fred Hampton [1971 | 88 minutes | Mike Gray/Howard Alk] An unprecedented, historically significant documentary on the slain leader of the Illinois Chapter of the Black Panther Party, Fred Hampton, killed in 1969 by Chicago police while he slept in his apartment. Filmmakers Mike Gray and Howard Alk were already shooting a portrait of this charismatic speaker and community organizer when his murder occurred. Arriving at the crime scene only a few hours after the police raid, the unsettling footage they captured was later used to contradict news reports and police testimony in what many believe to be Hampton's assassination.

Right On: A Friend Remembers Fred Hampton [1989 |18 minutes | December 4th Committee] Veteran community activist Jorja English Palmer [1930-2005] talks of the events of 1948-1969 which led Fred Hampton to the leadership of the Illinois Black Panther Party and to his murder as part of the FBI's secret counter intelligence program – COINTELPRO. Films start at 630pm. Post-screening discussion with Peter Kuttner, exhibit curator and filmmaker



We Want Freedom!

The Black Panther Party Platform &
Chicago's Rainbow Coalition

The 5th Month in a 5 month series on Income Inequality in America—and fighting back against it!
Uri-Eichen Gallery, 2101 S Halsted, Chicago
Opening September 9th, 6pm to 10pm

Young-Lords Panel Discussion September 9, 730pm: The Rainbow Coalition then and now!

Emphasis on the Serve the People programs: Breakfast for Children, Free Legal Programs and Health Clinic: Featuring photographs, posters, leaflets and newspapers from the Black Panthers, Young Lords, Young Patriots, Rising Up Angry and others who accepted the Panther's assessment of social and economic inequalities and used their "Ten Point Program" as a model in their own communities.

Rainbow Ephemera: A shelf of books the members of the Rainbow read, a loop of movie trailers of the films the Rainbow saw in theaters and a stack of vinyl records the Rainbow listened and danced to.

Open by appointment through October 7. Call for an appointment 312 852 7717

"We Want Freedom!"
The Black Panther Party Ten Point Plan & Chicago's Original Rainbow Coalition
[1968-1972]

In the period following the assassinations of Martin Luther King and Robert Kennedy and the Democratic Convention protests, a coalition emerged among the Black Panthers, Young Lords, Young Patriots, Rising Up Angry. Labeled the Rainbow Coalition by Fred Hampton, Chairman of the IL Black Panther Party, these groups accepted the Panther's assessment of social injustice and economic inequality and used the Panther's "Ten Point Program" as a model in their own communities.

"We Want Freedom" will include photographs, posters, leaflets, buttons and newspapers.

A program of speakers, films and music will accompany the exhibit- look out for more details!




Closing Reception Income Inequality A Cartoon Exhibit

Join URI-EICHEN for our 4th show in a 5 month series about Income Inequality in America.

Closing Reception - September 2, 6-10pm

Panel Discussion with Mike Konopacki and Gary Huck at 730pm.

credit: Mike Konopacki
Kirk Anderson
Clay Bennett
Eric Garcia
Gary Huck
Mike Keefe
Mike Konopacki
Jimmy Margulies
Jack Ohman
Joel Pett
Andy Singer
Signe Wilkinson
Matt Wuerker



In 1889, Puck magazine founder Joseph Keppler's cartoon, "The Bosses of the Senate," depicted top-hatted capitalists ruling the U.S. Senate dressed in huge moneybags labeled with every trust from coal to sugar. Above the senate chamber is a sign “This is the Senate: Of the monopolists, by the monopolists, for the monopolists.”

That same year, another Puck cartoonist, Samuel Ehrhardt, compared feudal overlords plundering peasants and serfs to the corporate oligarchs of his day exacting duties from farmers, workers and small businessmen. The title: “History Repeats Itself – The Robber Barons of the Middle Ages and the Robber Barons of Today.”

This was the Gilded Age—a period in the late 19th century when America was a plutocracy dominated by ruthless "robber barons" whose power and wealth left much of nation disenfranchised and impoverished.

History is repeating itself again. As former Labor Secretary Robert Reich recently observed: “In many respects America is back to the same giant concentrations of wealth and economic power that endangered democracy a century ago.” With 400 individuals owning half the country's wealth and politicians in the grip of elites who fill campaign coffers, income inequality has soared, leaving workers behind even as productivity and profits rise.

Cartoonists in the first Gilded Age—Keppler, Ehrhardt, Thomas Nast, Homer Davenport, and others—were relentless in their searing contempt of plutocrats and the economic injustices they visited upon others. But what of cartoonists in this New Gilded Age?

Just as Chicago humorist and muckraker journalist Finley Peter Dunne espoused at the turn of the last century, they too "comfort the afflicted and afflict the comfortable." They are as creative and committed as ever in holding true to a proud tradition of scorn for greed, corruption, and the sabotage of American democracy.

The evidence is this exhibit.

Mike Konopacki



Income Inequality A Cartoon Exhibit

Join URI-EICHEN for our 4th show in a 5 month series about Income Inequality in America.

Opening - August 12, 6-10pm
URI-EICHEN Gallery 2101 S Halsted, Chicago IL 60608
credit: Mike Konopacki
Kirk Anderson
Clay Bennett
Eric Garcia
Gary Huck
Mike Keefe
Mike Konopacki
Jimmy Margulies
Jack Ohman
Joel Pett
Andy Singer
Signe Wilkinson
Matt Wuerker

credit: Jimmy Margulies

1% PRIVILEGE IN A TIME OF GLOBAL INEQUALITY The 3rd month in a five month series of art shows and discussions about income inequality in America

URI-EICHEN Gallery 2101 S Halsted

Opening - July, 8 6-10pm


An exhibit curated by Myles Little and with written commentary by

-Joseph Stiglitz, PhD, Nobel Prize-winning economist and inequality expert

-Geoff Dyer, National Book Critics Circle Award-winning writer

This project was inspired in part by conversations with Daniel Brena (b. 1982, USA), director of Centro Fotográfico Manuel Álvarez Bravo in Oaxaca, Mexico.

Photo credit: Varvara in Her Home Cinema, Moscow, 2010, Anna Skladmann

Featuring dozens of artists interpreting the tremendous inequality in our world today.

Discussion 7pm: The Chicago Fight for $15! Featuring organizers and workers from the front line and how you can get involved in the fight!

Founded in November of 2012, the Workers Organizing Committee of Chicago is a union of fast food workers fighting for a $15/hour living wage, the right to form a union without retaliation, and respect in the workplace. Workers live and work in different neighborhoods across the Chicagoland area including Chicago’s suburbs. The Fight for 15 campaign has won major victories in cities across the country such as Seattle, San Francisco, Los Angeles, and New York City. We believe that people who work hard for a living should make enough to support themselves, their families and their neighborhoods—and that workers should be treated with dignity and respect. Fight for 15!

Miles Little:

The story of inequality is impossible to ignore these days. My morning commute through Manhattan affords me glimpses of both appalling poverty and magnificent wealth. Everyone from billionaire businessmen to the Pope has spoken out against this troubling development.

While we may think we understand wealth through television and tabloids, what we see represents only a drop in the bucket. In 2014, the highest paid athlete in the world, Floyd Mayweather, made $105 million. In the same year, the highest paid hedge fund manager in the world, Kenneth Griffin, made $1.3 billion. And yet Mayweather is world famous, while for most people Griffin doesn’t register at all. And while we may think we understand inequality, in fact we don’t at all. Harvard Business School asked Americans how much they think major CEOs earn relative to ordinary workers. The median respondent thought the ratio was perhaps 30 to 1. The reality? It's over to 350 to 1.

There is a long history of photography denouncing poverty, such as Jacob Riis’ photos from 19th century New York slums or Mary Ellen Mark’s photos of Seattle’s homeless children. But recent decades have witnessed a boom in strong photography questioning privilege. Consider Jim Goldberg’s "Rich and Poor" shot in San Francisco, or Lauren Greenfield’s "kids + money" shot in Los Angeles.

In curating 1%: Privilege in a Time of Global Inequality, I have tried to gather images that examine wealth globally and in many different ways. One reference point I had for my project was Edward Steichen's 1955 exhibition The Family of Man. Curated in the optimistic postwar era, it presented over 500 documentary photos of very different people from around the world, grouped under common themes such as family, religion and work. It argued for, in Steichen’s words, "the essential oneness of mankind". But as inequality reaches historic levels, I find this thesis less and less viable. Consider, for example, that the 6 heirs to the Walmart fortune own more wealth than the bottom 42% of Americans combined. I wanted to respond to Steichen’s project by finding images on similar themes but taken in the realm of wealth. While The Family of Man was a sprawling, varied and democratic mix of images by both known and unknown photographers, I took a different approach, befitting the exclusive spirit of my topic. I selected a small number of polished, well-crafted, medium format photographs by some of today’s best photographers. I wanted to borrow the language of privilege and use it to observe and critique privilege.

Some of the images map out points in the world of affluence, such as education, leisure and healthcare (while avoiding clichés like fur coats and private jets). Other images are positioned outside the world of the 1%, looking back in. For example, one of Nina Berman’s images shows a crowd of hopefuls attending a church in the American South that teaches that Jesus wants us to be rich. Some images contain juxtapositions of class, such as Guillaume Bonn’s photo of maids in a wealthy Kenyan household. Still other images are more abstract, such as Sasha Bezzubov’s photo of a cloud of golden dust over a logging road in Gabon, which evokes for me the ephemeral nature of wealth.

In March 2015, billionaire private equity investor Paul Tudor Jones II publicly declared that the wealth gap “cannot and will not persist...it will get closed. History always does it. It typically happens in one of three ways: either through revolution, higher taxes, or wars.”

So then, what will it be? I hope this project helps spur that conversation.

—Myles Little

Open by appointment through August 5. Please call 312 852 7717 for an appointment.





MAXWELL STREET’S LAST HOPE

Join URI-EICHEN for our second show in a 5 month series about Income Inequality in America

Opening - June 10, 6-10pm
URI-EICHEN Gallery 2101 S Halsted, Chicago IL 60608

Opening Night Live Music: Low-reen & the Maxwell St Market Blues Band, featuring Killer Ray Allison, Rasheed Stewart Muhammad, & Chris Alexander.

MAXWELL STREET’S LAST HOPE will explore the meager resources that remained available in the 1990s to the once thriving community of the Maxwell Street Market neighborhood. In 1989, a master plan published by the University of Illinois at Chicago made it clear that expansion south of Roosevelt Road would ultimately consume the Maxwell Street neighborhood and displace its world famous open‐air street market. In response, preservation and community activists came together to defend the spirit and built fabric of a place that had persevered economically and socially for nearly a century due to its character of entrepreneurship, cultural diversity, and resilience. Photographs by Ron Gordon and Lee Landry document this historically pivotal time, and a multimedia assemblage by artist Nicholas Jackson recalls the struggle.

Photo credit Lee Landry

Since 1997, the Maxwell Street Foundation (MSF) has sought to preserve and interpret the history of Chicago’s Maxwell Street for future generations.

To fulfill its mission, the MSF has collected Maxwell Street artifacts, developed public programs and presentations city- and suburban-wide, created a book and portfolio of Maxwell Street images, and contributed to exhibitions at the Chicago History Museum, Museum of Science and Industry, and the Spertus Institute.
Frank Scott Jr. Photo credit Lee Landry

In this exhibition, the MSF will draw on its collection and the work of its board members to explore the economic injustice served to the Maxwell Street Market neighborhood as it faced redevelopment in the 1990s. Fully realized in 2002 with the emergence of the University Village Marketplace comprised of mixed-use retail shops, eateries and dormitories, the face of historic Maxwell Street was forever changed to exclude its former residents and most of its former businesses. Its century-old streetscape that had served as an authentic public space for a cultural mix of residents, shoppers, vendors, merchants, street musicians and performers was erased, and the spirit of “the place” surrendered.


Jimmy Lee Robinson. Photo credit Lee Landry

Lee Landry is a photojournalist, a Unit Still Photographer for film productions, and a long-standing illustrator. He is also a traveler and has traveled half way around the world with camera in tow. In his images, he documents almost everything he does and his experiences similar to the way of a writer. Having been published in various magazines, newspapers and books, Lee took aim at the Maxwell Street Market in the 1990s and developed a photographic project series entitled: Maxwell Street: The People. Well-known for its food, its stores, blues music and the market itself, Lee photographed the people who lived and worked there that few knew about: the people of Maxwell Street. Lee is on the board of directors for the Maxwell Street Foundation.

Pinetop Perkins. Photo credit Lee Landry

Ron Gordon is a photographer and preservationist whose work includes the documentation of Maxwell Street buildings, its streetscape, and sometimes the people who resided there. Having lived in Pilsen for 30 years, Ron's work frequently focused on Chicago's south and west sides. During 1995-1996, he was commissioned by the University of Illinois at Chicago to prepare the photographic work for the Level 1 HABS/HAER documentation required by the federal government for the Maxwell Street area redevelopment. He also photographed an iconic image of one of the last buildings' demise on Maxwell Street during a fire on the eve of the Millennium, now published in City 2000: words and images about Chicago and its People. Quoting Ron, "Often I have been the last person to document something as it was about to disappear. This visual record of changes in the urban landscape is also social documentary, since architecture cannot exist without people, or people without architecture."

Ron earned a BA in language and literature (1965), an MA in literature (1968), and completed preliminary doctoral studies in language and literature at the University of Illinois. He is the recipient of a Fullbright travel grant and two Focus Infinity Fund grants, and owns the Ron Gordon Photographic Services photo lab. His work is included in the permanent collections of the Art Institute of Chicago, the Chicago Historical Society, the Museum of Contemporary Photography, the Illinois State Museum, the Paris Art Center, and the Library of Congress. He has co-authored with John Paulett two books for Arcadia Publishing, Inc., "Printers Row Chicago" (2003) and "Forgotten Chicago" (2004). In March 2016, Ron relocated to North Carolina with his wife Sallie. Ron has gifted a substantial quantity of his photographic work to the Maxwell Street Foundation documenting Maxwell Street’s transition.

Nick Jackson is a photographer, illustrator, and writer concerned with the intersection of personal and regional histories. Nick spearheaded a StoryCorps partnership with the Maxwell Street Foundation in 2015 recording the oral histories of people associated with the market, its music, and neighborhood. From 2012 to 2014, Nick served as a Peace Corps volunteer in a rural Ukrainian town where he taught English and art classes. Since returning to Chicago, he has continued teaching as well as producing illustrations and comics. These include Falling Rocks, an illustrated narrative of the protests in Kyiv that he presented in the "Brain Frame" performative comics reading series. He is currently a finalist for a Fulbright study grant that will possibly send him back to the Ukraine next year. Nick holds a BFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, and is on the board of directors for the Maxwell Street Foundation.

The Last Fish: Water is a Human Right!

Hosted by the Revolutionary Poets Brigade
May 21, 6:30-9:30pm

For more than two years, emergency manager dictators under the direction of Governor Rick Snyder of Michigan have been laying waste to state public resources. The most egregious acts have been the water shutoffs in Detroit, the destruction of Detroit public schools, and the poisoning of a whole city with contaminated water. Flint, Michigan changed its water source 2 years ago to the Flint River and since then residents have suffered lead poisoning and other ailments due to other toxins in the water. All the children of the city are now affected, an irreversible process. Since this disgrace came to national attention a few months ago, similar problems have been cropping up all across the country. At the same time, emergency managers have been imposed in many communities across the country, steps toward wiping out the last vestiges we have of democracy.

This is a poetic response to the crisis in Michigan and the harbinger it holds for the entire country. It follows National Poetry Month, and we can think of no better way to dedicate our word-weapons than in defense of Flint and for the preservation of democracy. Art is not simply a mirror to reflect society; it is a hammer to shape it!

Featured Poets
Angelina Llongueras
Sarah Carson
"the Bard of the Flint Working Class"
Eric Allen Yankee
Elizabeth Marino
Lew Rosenbaum
Robert Wilson, jr
Michelle Saltouros

Music:
Adam Gottlieb & OneLove
Performance:
Sojourner Zenobia

Speakers:
Cranston Knight
Andy Willis
Arielle Maldonado



Commemorating Les Orear and the
Union Stockyard Gate

URI-EICHEN Gallery 2101 S Halsted
May 14, 2 pm-4 pm

Join Uri-Eichen Gallery and the Illinois Labor History Society for a free reception and photography display featuring images celebrating the life of ILHS co-founder Les Orear and Chicago stockyard workers and the exhibit of Oscar Magallanes' work (see above) The reception will take place immediately following the commemoration of a bench and plaque to honor Les Orear at the site of Stockyard Gate, located at the intersection of Halsted and Exchange, near 41st Street. Les Orear passed away at the age of 103, in 2014. He dedicated his life to organizing for workers' rights and preserving and sharing their history. He was an organizer for United Packinghouse Workers of America and co-founder and president emeritus of the Illinois Labor History Society.





Oscar Magallanes, New American Portrait

Join URI-EICHEN as we start our 5 month series about Income Inequality in America

Opening - May 13, 6-10pm
Uri-Eichen Gallery 2101 S Halsted, Chicago IL 60608

7pm: Artist Discussion with Oscar Magallanes and Citizen Action Illinois Discussion on Fighting Inequality in Illinois A “New American Portrait” is an exhibition of new works by Los Angeles based artist Oscar Magallanes. Magallanes’ work is heavily influenced by the social and environmental issues of his upbringing of the Mexican Barrio. His work is known for its use bold graphics, cultural and political iconography, along with visual rhetoric of popular people’s movements such as that of labor and civil rights movements.

This new body of work pays homage to Diego Rivera and Bertram David Wolfe’s “Portrait of America” which was a collaboration in 1934 that tasked students of the New Workers School in New York to research alternate histories of labor in the United States. While Rivera and Wolfe’s work was unapologetically communist and idealistic in its assertion that the workers’ movement would create a classless society, we can clearly see in the 82 years since the widening rift between the working class and the wealthy in the United States today. Rivera’s work while having proven naive in the ability of communism to challenge capitalism, has at the same time been proven correct in it’s predictions of capitalism’s oppressiveness to labor.

Set against the current theater of politics in which xenophobia has replaced the “good neighbor” Magallanes’ work serves as a portrait of America through its relationship with labor. A changing portrait of late capitalism or post-industrialism that reflects the enduring historical traumas of a complex people’s history of a nation.

Magallanes was raised in the Azusa Barrio of Los Angeles. At the age of fifteen, he was expelled from high school, but was accepted into the Ryman Arts program at the Otis-Parsons College campus which encouraged him to become a professional artist. His artwork is influenced by the cultural and social elements of his upbringing along with his years of previous work as a graphic designer. The experience of participating in two distinct worlds continues to inform the work.


April 22nd 6pm-10pm: 120 DAYS: Undocumented in America (In)Justice for All Film Screening, Film at 7pm

Uri-Eichen Gallery 2101 S Halsted, Chicago IL 60608

Family man Miguel Cortes could be forced to leave the country in four months as a result of his immigration status. In exchange for Miguel agreeing to leave the country voluntarily and paying a $5,000 bond, a North Carolina immigration judge offers him 120 days to get his affairs in order before leaving his wife and two daughters in the United States to continue their education. Miguel has 120 Days to work hard, save money and weigh his options about returning to Mexico alone, or risk changing his name and disappearing back into another U.S. city illegally to keep his family together. http://www.120daysmovie.com/ “The (In)Justice for All Film Festival is an exciting and groundbreaking event designed to raise awareness about the magnitude of the harm caused by mass incarceration, by harnessing the creative energies of dedicated, socially conscious filmmakers. See these films, expand your mind, grow your heart, and join the movement for justice.” –Michelle Alexander

From April 21 through April 30, 2015, the power of film will be harnessed in the service of justice as the (In)Justice for All Film Festival presents a series of FREE screenings, many of which feature panel discussions to provide addition context. Please avail yourself of this unique opportunity to deepen your understanding of the issues, to be angered, to be touched, and most importantly, to be called to action. Go to www.injusticeforallff.com for more information, and to RSVP.





Con Justicia Para Todos

Opening April 8, 2016 6pm-10pm

Uri-Eichen Gallery, 2101 S Halsted Chicago IL, 60608

Uri-Eichen Gallery, in partnership with the Latino Art Conference at UIC and the Third Annual (In)Justice For All Film Festival, hosts a group show of artists in Pilsen and Little Village, Chicago, about justice issues in the Latino Community. Group show with Rene Arceo, Eric Garcia, Nicole Marroquin and Pauline Camacho’s students at Benito Juarez High Community Academy, Gabriel Villa, and The 96 Acres Project.

Reception and screening for (In)Justice for All Film Festival: 4-22 6pm-10pm

By Appointment through 5-5-16

Rene Arceo was Born in Mexico in 1959 and moved to Chicago in 1979. He studied fine arts at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (1981-85). He received a BFA and a Teacher Certificate (K-12 grade). Arceo has participated in dozens of group and solo exhibitions in the United States, Mexico, Canada, Poland, France, Nicaragua and Spain. Arceo lives in Chicago where he co-founded the Galeria Ink Works (1984-87) and the Mexican Printmaking Workshop (1990-96). He founded Arceo Press in 2005 to foster international collaborations among printmakers. Arceo is currently a member of Consejo Grafico (a national network of Latino print shops), Chicago Society of Artists, FEDECMI Casa Michoacán-Chicago, and Mid America Print Alliance. www.arceoART.us/ArceoPress

Eric Garcia is known for mixing history and culture with contemporary themes, Eric J. Garcia always tries to create art that is much more than just aesthetics. Garcia has shown in numerous national and international exhibitions, has received many awards such as the prestigious Jacob Javits Fellowship and is currently an artist in residence at the Hyde Park Art Center. Originally from Albuquerque, New Mexico, Garcia came to Chicago in 2007, to study at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago where he earned his Masters of Fine Arts degree. A versatile artist working in an assortment of media, from hand-printed posters, to published political cartoons, to sculptural installations.

Gabriel Villa was born and raised in the El Paso, Texas/ Ciudad Juarez border region and currently resides in Chicago, Illinois, where he is an active member of the arts community. Villa received his MFA from the University of Delaware. Villa is an experienced teacher and was Visiting Artist at Stateville Prison, Crest Hill IL, with the Prison Neighborhood & Prison Arts Project. Villa served from 2005-2011 as Director of Yollocalli Arts Reach, a youth initiative of the National Museum of Mexican Art and also served as Co-Curator for the Chicago Kraft Foods Gallery from 2006-2011 at the National Museum of Mexican Art

Nicole Marroquin is an interdisciplinary artist whose creative practice includes collaboration, research, teaching, and strategic intervention. Marroquin is an experienced classroom teacher and has collaborated with youth on art-based action research. In addition to activism in education, Marroquin exhibits internationally. Marroquin and Paulina Camacho, an Art Teacher at Benito Juarez Community Academy, are presenting student work that will be presented at the LAN symposium at UIC and at the National Art Education Association conference on Latino social justice history, including piece related to the campaign to build Benito Juarez High Community Academy.

96 Acres is a series of community-engaged, site-responsive art projects that involve community stakeholders’ ideas about social and restorative justice issues, and that examine the impact of incarceration at the Cook County Jail on Chicago’s West Side. 96 Acres uses multi-disciplinary practices to explore the social and political implications of incarceration on communities of color. Through creative processes and coalition building, 96 Acres aims to generate alternative narratives reflecting on power and responsibility by presenting insightful and informed collective responses for the transformation of a space that occupies 96 acres, but has a much larger reaching outcome.

May –September: Each month a new show on growing income inequality in America- Oscar Magallanes, Uri-Eichen collaborates with the Maxwell Street Foundation, 1%: Privilege in a Time of Global Inequality (a collaboration with the Gage Gallery), Cartoons about economic inequality curated by Mike Konopacki and Gary Huck, and more!





Autonomia Contra la Muerte / Autonomy Against Death

Social Justice Posters from Mexico. Posters and Prints from Grafica de Lucha, Escuela Cultura Popular Martires del 68, and Mujeres Grabando Resistencia

Opening March 11 from 6pm to 10pm
Uri-Eichen Gallery 2101 S Halsted, Chicago IL 60608

Presenting linocut & silkscreen prints from the struggle in Mexico from collectives Grafica de Lucha, Mujeres Grabando Resistencia, & Escuela de Cultura Popular Martires del 68. These works hail from a country in which the government maintains an internal war against its own population sponsored by transnational capitol & imperialist governments like the U.S.A.

Proceeds of poster and print sales 100% to support the movements! Most prints priced at $25

Donations accepted on opening evening for Budget or Else Save CSU- Support the students at Chicago State University as they fight Governor Rauner’s attack on higher education and working people in Chicago!

Discussion 7pm

Celeste Ixchel on the posters, Jeanette Martin from STITCH Milwaukee, a community organization, and Pancho MacFarland on the Zapatista Movement.

Pancho McFarland, PhD, is a former b-boy, current hip hop head, professor of sociology at Chicago State University, author, martial artist and father. He is an activist within the food justice and local food movements and is a martial artist.

Jeanette Martin is a chingona Xicana artist and organizer from Milwaukee.She is one of the founders of STITCH, has taught a Latina Radical Arts class at UWMilwaukee, where she was also Media Specialist at the Center for Latin American & Caribbean Studies, served as Gender & Sexuality Resource Center Program Assistant at Marquette University and is currently opening a panadera gallery space in Milwaukee,WI

Celeste Ixchel will be speaking about the posters. She has collaborated and celebrated with STITCH in Milwaukee. She created posters with Grafica de Lucha and was blown away when she met la Martires 68 in 1997 set up in the street outside the historic site of Costureras-- site of the September 19th Union of Seamstresses in Mexico City. She has recently been inspired by the works of Mujeres Grabando Resistencia.

Mujeres Grabando Resistencias – Women Recording Resistance Is a collective of women engravers based out of Mexico City. Their objective is to create reproducible images, in the streets of Mexico & other countries of Abya Yala ( pre colonialist name for American continent), with clear, understandable messages against violence towards women & for women’s right to self defense.

The School of Popular Culture “Martyrs of 68” was born in January 1988, 20 years after the massacre of Tlatelolco, to commemorate the fateful historical event in which countless peaceful protesters, from all walks of life, were brutally murdered by Mexican military and police with the support of the U.S CIA. Artistic and cultural workshops are held with the goal of sharing tools and knowledge that serve social movements and accomplish daily graphic production in the silkscreen and engraving workshops.

Graphica de Lucha is a visual call to organize, take to the streets & awaken consciousness. The images travel from hand to hand, on the walls of the streets, in collective spaces and where ever people organize for justice . These are graphics that fight back, invite reflection, counter fear, inspire and mobilize. Since the launch of the Zapatistan 6th Declaration of the Lacandon Jungle in 2005, Graphica de Lucha has been both a traveling and stationary workshop creating silkscreened and digital images in various languages which call for action & social justice.

Live music with Linda Boyle and Adam Gottlieb 8pm

Linda doesn't just sing a song, she tells our stories. A Chicago singer, song writer, Linda Boyle's repertoire includes many originals, roots, world, folk, Blues, Country and Old Time. She sings in several languages, with a large repertoire in Spanish. Her performances include festivals in the Midwest to South Dakota and countless rallies and events supporting peace, anti-racism, workers, public education, immigrant rights and folks with disabilities.

Open by appointment through April 1, 2016. For an appointment, call 312 852 7717



Special Event: PAPER PROTEST WORKSHOP with Ellen Gradman


2-28
1pm-4pm

Have something to say? Have a desire to create a radical image? Want to express an idea visually, but not sure how to do it? Then this workshop is for you! No art experience is necessary! The wonderful thing about activism art (Artivism) is at the core it is inclusive and democratic. The workspace will be in Uri-Eichen Gallery, and participants will be surrounded by the art work of Fred Klonsky and Ellen Gradman. We will also refer to iconic revolutionary art for inspiration. Each participant will create a personal, Paper Protest. You will be exposed to ways to think big, yet edit your thoughts to create a visual image with or without words. A variety of materials will be used including but not limited to; paper, markers, stencils, clip art, computer/copy machine printouts. We will also discuss ways to use the images created in the immediate future.

All materials provided, no charge rsvp to Ellen Gradman at everychicago@gmail.com

URI-EICHEN Gallery 2101 S Halsted Chicago, Illinois 60608


Ellen Gradman and Fred Klonsky: Art Work and Activism- Posters and Cartoons on the Politics of the City

URI-EICHEN Gallery 2101 S Halsted Chicago, Illinois 60608

Opening February 12th 6pm-10pm

Also displayed art work created by children during the Dyett Hunger strike and work created by Drummond students.

Artists Discussion 7pm

Spoken word poets and music by 4/12 Seconds of Reverb (CPS teachers make the best music!)

Elen Gradman is a Chicago based artist and teacher. She is an activist in labor and education support and she has employer her art to support the movement in Chicago.

Fred Klonsky has lived in Chicago for more than 40 years. Fred was the president of his teachers union local, was a K-5 teacher for nearly three decades, and writes and draws about justice issues in Chicago.

Special Event: PAPER PROTEST WORKSHOP with Ellen Gradman
2-28
1pm-4pm

Have something to say? Have a desire to create a radical image? Want to express an idea visually, but not sure how to do it? Then this workshop is for you! No art experience is necessary! The wonderful thing about activism art (Artivism) is at the core it is inclusive and democratic. The workspace will be in Uri-Eichen Gallery, and participants will be surrounded by the art work of Fred Klonsky and Ellen Gradman. We will also refer to iconic revolutionary art for inspiration. Each participant will create a personal, Paper Protest. You will be exposed to ways to think big, yet edit your thoughts to create a visual image with or without words. A variety of materials will be used including but not limited to; paper, markers, stencils, clip art, computer/copy machine printouts. We will also discuss ways to use the images created in the immediate future.

All materials provided, no charge rsvp to Ellen Gradman at everychicago@gmail.com

By Appointment through March 4. To


Opening JANUARY 15: Not a Bug Splat: Artists Against Drone Warfare

Documentary photographs from the project Not a Bug Splat in Pakistan URI-EICHEN Gallery 2101 South Halsted CHICAGO Illinois 60608

Opening January 15 from 6-10pm

7pm Film Screening of Citizenfour

Following the Film: Discussion- America Post 9/11: Whistleblowers and the Surveillance State. Moderated by Kari Lydersen, panel includes Rory Fanning, Joe Isobaker, and Brandon Smith.


About Not a Bug Splat: Since 2004, drone strikes in Pakistan have killed an estimated 3,000+ people. While some of these were high-profile targets, a large number were civilians, including 160 children. The people who operate the drones describe their casualties as “bug splats”, since viewing the body through a grainy-green video image gives the sense of an insect being crushed. In order to show the drone operators the actual face of the children they might end up bombing - rather than a dehumanized dot on a screen – the collaborative printed an extremely large scale (70 feet by 100 feet approximately) portrait of a child done attack survivor living in the area where the drones are operated. The portrait was laid upon the ground facing up, so that a drone camera will capture her, transmitting her to the drone operator’s screen. This is a part of the Inside Out Project with French Artist J.R. This show is a collaboration between Uri-Eichen Gallery and Ali Rez, Saks Afridi, Assam Khalid, Akash Goel, JR, Insiya Syed, Noor Behram, Jamil Akhtar, the artists in the collaborative and the InsideOut project.

Please see www.saksafridi.com, alimumtaz.com and notabugsplat.com for more on this work.

About Citizenfour: Citizenfour
is a 2014 documentary film directed by Laura Poitras, concerning Edward Snowden and the NSA spying scandal. Citizenfour is the last part in a three part series of documentaries about post 9-11 America. Citizenfour won the Academy Award for Best Documentary Feature at the 2015 Oscars. URI-EICHEN Gallery 2101 South Halsted CHICAGO Illinois 60608 info@URI-EICHEN.com | www.uri-eichen.com By appointment through 2-5-16. For an appointment call 312 852 7717.



About the Panel:

Rory Fanning walked across the United States for the Pat Tillman Foundation in 2008–2009, following two deployments to Afghanistan with the 2nd Army Ranger Battalion. He is a war resister, military counter recruiter, and writer living in Chicago, Illinois. His writing has appeared in the Guardian, the Nation, Mother Jones, Salon, Truthout, TruthDig, TomDispatch, Jacobin, Socialist Worker and others. He speaks at high schools and universities about his walk across the US and his experience in the military.

Brandon Smith is a Chicago-based independent journalist who, with the help of whistleblowers and the Freedom of Information Act, has reported on civil rights abuses, privatization of public assets, digital privacy concerns, and pollution of land and water. Smith recently fought for the release of the Laquan McDonald dashcam video in the City of Chicago.

Joe Iosbaker is a member of Anti-War Committee – Chicago. In 2010, Joe was one of the 23 anti-war activists raided by the FBI and subpoenaed to a federal grand jury. He was a national coordinator for the anti-NATO protest in 2012. He is a coordinator for the Committee to Stop FBI Repression in their campaign for Justice for Rasmea Odeh. In 2015, he became a member of the Steering Committee of the Chicago Alliance Against Racist and Political Repression.

Kari Lydersen is a Chicago-based reporter, author and journalism instructor. She currently is co-director of the Social Justice News Nexus, a Fellowship program at the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University that brings together graduate students and professional reporters to do in-depth stories on topics including drug policy and mental health. From 2013-2014, she was a research associate at the Medill Watchdog Project at Northwestern. She is the author of four books including Shoot an Iraqi: Art, Life and Resistance Under the Gun (City Lights, 2008), Revolt on Goose Island: The Chicago Window Factory Takeover and What it Says About the Economic Crisis (Melville House, 2009) and most recently Mayor 1%: Rahm Emanuel and the Rise of Chicago’s 99% (Haymarket Books, 2013). She also has taught journalism at Columbia College Chicago and the School of the Art Institute of Chicago; and she works with youth from marginalized communities through the non-profit journalism program We the People Media.

JANUARY 17: Celebrating Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and Remembering the Labor Movement Struggles in Memphis, 1968 Reception 5-8pm

Screening Film At the River I Stand Film at 530pm

Discussion: Dr. King’s Economic Justice Campaign moderated by Mike Siviwe Elliot

At the River I Stand covers two very eventful months in 1968 that culminate with the success of the unionization of sanitation workers and the tragic death of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in Memphis. At The River I Stand tells the story of how, after integration, African Americans were pushed to the bottom of society. With extremely low wages and poor working conditions it was only a matter of time before emotions strained towards the breaking point. In February 1968, the atrocious working conditions for African Americans came to a head with the death of two sanitation workers. With no insurance or worker’s compensation, their families were left with nothing but heartache and more desperate times. As a result, 1300 sanitation workers walked off the job in a strike that lasted 65 days. With the simple statement “I am a Man” the worker’s movement gained momentum and determination. The strike then received national attention as Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. brought his Poor People’s Campaign to Memphis.

Mike Siviwe Elliott is a longtime labor, community, political and video activist. He is a recently retired third generation member of the United Auto Workers. Originally from Detroit, Michigan he was influenced by revolutionary auto workers like General Baker (DRUM) and the legendary James and Grace Boggs. He served on the steering committee of the Illinois Labor Network Against Apartheid, Hands Off Assata Campaign and Rising In Solidarity with Ayiti (RISA) on behalf of the people of Haiti. He was the elected Recording Secretary at UAW Local 551, founded their annual Workers Memorial Day ceremony in 2000 and established the Union Solidarity Committee. He is currently a Trustee with Illinois Labor History Society and serves as Chair of the Labor Committee for the Chicago Alliance Against Racist & Political Repression, where he’s a leader in the struggle to establish an all elected civilian police accountability council (CPAC) in Chicago.

February: Opening February 12th - Ellen Gradman and Fred Klonsky Art Work and Activism. Posters and cartoons on the politics of the City. Spoken word poets and music by 4/12 Seconds of Reverb - CPS teachers make the best music!

March: Gráfica de Lucha Posters from Mexico

April: Con Justicia Para Todos- Group Show and (In)Justice for All Film Screening

May –September: Each month a new show on growing income inequality in America- Oscar Magallanes, Uri-Eichen collaborates with the Maxwell Street Foundation, 1%: Privilege in a Time of Global Inequality (a collaboration with the Gage Gallery), Group Show with Gary Huck, Mike Konopacki and others cartoons about inequality.



Revisiting Reparations: Afro Colombian Communities: 4th Annual Human Rights Day Show

Michael Bracey, Ruth Goring and Mary Kelsey

A multimedia show of photography, pastels and drawings about human rights in Afro Colombian Communitie

Human Rights and Gold Mining in Colombia: Reception December 11, 6-10pm - Discussion: Mary Kelsey, Mike Bracey, Steve Cagan, Kari Lydersen and Adriana Cardona-Maguigad

Opening discussions 7pm December 11th.

URI-EICHEN Gallery 2101 South Halsted CHICAGO Illinois 60608 | info@URI-EICHEN.com | www.uri-eichen.com | By appointment through 1-1-16. For an appointment call 312 852 7717.

January 2016:

Celebrating MLK and remembering the Labor Struggles in Memphis, 1968, screening "At the River I Stand" Laura Poitras’ documentary on America after 9/11/01: Citizen Four

Michael Bracey is a freelance photographer currently living in Chicago, Illinois. His work has been published in various magazines, newspapers, annual reports, and purchased by many private collectors worldwide. He is the author of several books, the latest being Rivers of Women, co-authored with Shirley LeFlore and published by 2LeafPress.org He holds an Associates of Arts degree from Hutchinson Community College, Hutchinson, Kansas (1979), a Bachelor of Arts degree in Communications from Webster University, St. Louis, MO (1981), and a Master of Arts degree in Interdisciplinary Arts from Columbia College Chicago (1997).



Mary Kelsey’s art looks at how human culture functions within the natural physical environment. She received a Fulbright research grant for Central America, where her drawings of rural culture were published in several formats, including the first native language primer for school children of an indigenous rain forest group. Kelsey’s paintings and drawings have been exhibited in New York, Boston and other cities. She has degrees in anthropology from Stanford and in painting from the Museum School, Boston. She has taught at Syracuse University and Cape Cod Community College. She has illustrated and designed books and other publications, painted museum installations, and exhibited nationally. Her work has appeared in publications in Guatemala, Honduras, Costa Rica and the US.



Ruth Goring’s poetry collections are Soap Is Political (Glass Lyre, 2015) and Yellow Doors (WordFarm, 2004). Her poems have also appeared, or will soon, in Calyx, RHINO, Crab Creek Review, Pilgrimage, Sin Fronteras, New Madrid, Reunion, Zona de carga / Loading Zone, and elsewhere. Having grown up in Colombia, she has provided accompaniment and advocacy to peace communities in that country; one form that has taken is a series of chalk pastel portraits of Afro-Colombians. Currently she serves on the board of Colombia Vive Chicago. Hear her recent Chicago Public Radio reading/interview at http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism/global-activism-poet-ruth-goring-says-colombia-soap-political-113428. Ruth is a senior manuscript editor at University of Chicago Press and teaches in the Graham School’s editing certificate program.

Revisiting Reparations: Afro Colombian Communities: 4th Annual Human Rights Day Show

Michael Bracey, Ruth Goring and Mary Kelsey

Opening December 4, 6-10pm- featuring Ruth Goring, Michael Bracey, and December 11, 6-10pm- featuring Mary Kelsey and discussion with Steve Cagan. Opening discussions at each reception moderated by Kari Lydersen

URI-EICHEN Gallery 2101 South Halsted CHICAGO Illinois 60608 info@URI-EICHEN.com | www.uri-eichen.com

By appointment through 1-1-16. For an appointment call 312 852 7717.

January 2016:

Celebrating MLK and remembering the Labor Struggles in Memphis, 1968, screening "At the River I Stand" Laura Poitras’ documentary on America after 9/11/01: Citizen Four

Michael Bracey is a freelance photographer currently living in Chicago, Illinois. His work has been published in various magazines, newspapers, annual reports, and purchased by many private collectors worldwide. He is the author of several books, the latest being Rivers of Women, co-authored with Shirley LeFlore and published by 2LeafPress.org He holds an Associates of Arts degree from Hutchinson Community College, Hutchinson, Kansas (1979), a Bachelor of Arts degree in Communications from Webster University, St. Louis, MO (1981), and a Master of Arts degree in Interdisciplinary Arts from Columbia College Chicago (1997).

Mary Kelsey’s art looks at how human culture functions within the natural physical environment. She received a Fulbright research grant for Central America, where her drawings of rural culture were published in several formats, including the first native language primer for school children of an indigenous rain forest group. Kelsey’s paintings and drawings have been exhibited in New York, Boston and other cities. She has degrees in anthropology from Stanford and in painting from the Museum School, Boston. She has taught at Syracuse University and Cape Cod Community College. She has illustrated and designed books and other publications, painted museum installations, and exhibited nationally. Her work has appeared in publications in Guatemala, Honduras, Costa Rica and the US.

Ruth Goring’spoetry collections are Soap Is Political (Glass Lyre, 2015) and Yellow Doors (WordFarm, 2004). Her poems have also appeared, or will soon, in Calyx, RHINO, Crab Creek Review, Pilgrimage, Sin Fronteras, New Madrid, Reunion, Zona de carga / Loading Zone, and elsewhere. Having grown up in Colombia, she has provided accompaniment and advocacy to peace communities in that country; one form that has taken is a series of chalk pastel portraits of Afro-Colombians. Currently she serves on the board of Colombia Vive Chicago. Hear her recent Chicago Public Radio reading/interview at http://www.wbez.org/series/global-activism/global-activism-poet-ruth-goring-says-colombia-soap-political-113428. Ruth is a senior manuscript editor at University of Chicago Press and teaches in the Graham School’s editing certificate program.






Joe Hill 100 Years Part 5: Don’t Mourn, Organize!

The final series show, commemorating Joe Hill - the 100th anniversary of his execution by the state of Utah.

OPENING: Friday, November 13th, 2015 - 6:00pm-10:00pm

Collections of Joe Hill’s union, the Industrial Workers of the World General Headquarters, the collections of the Illinois Labor History Society and the Fight for Joe Hill!, Posters from Molly Crabapple, and Jon Langford’s Joe Hill’s Coffin!

URI-EICHEN Gallery 2101 South Halsted CHICAGO Illinois 60608 info@URI-EICHEN.com | www.uri-eichen.com

On the trial and execution of Joe Hill, Paul Durica. Durica is a teacher, writer, and public historian. Since 2008 he has been producing a series of free and interactive public history programs under the name Pocket Guide to Hell.

7pm: Live Joe Hill Music with Bucky Halker. Folksinger, writer, rocker, scholar, labor songster, alt-country twanger.“The living heir of Woody Guthrie . . . Halker reaches into his strings and conjures up the passionate fire of John

Steinbeck.” (Allgemeine Zeitung Mainz, Germany)

By appointment through 11-28-15. For an appointment call 312 852 7717.

December: Revisiting Reparations: Afro Colombian Communities: 4th Annual Human Rights Day Show: Opening December 4, 6-10pm and December 11, 6-10pm- featuring Ruth Goring, Michael Bracey, Steve Cagan and Mary Kelsey. Opening discussion moderated by Kari Lydersen- Opening discussion moderated by Kari Lydersen




Pilsen Stories: Family and Fiesta Del Sol

URI-EICHEN Founders Kathy Steichen and Christopher Urias

OPENING: Friday, October 9, 2015 - 6:00pm -10pm

Pilsen Open Studios Hours: Saturday, October 24 and Sunday October 25 12:00pm-6pm

100% of sales from Pilsen Stories will fund gallery programming and are tax deductible (Uri-Eichen is now a 501c3!)


URI-EICHEN Gallery 2101 South Halsted CHICAGO Illinois 60608 info@URI-EICHEN.com | www.uri-eichen.com

Chicago is a studio for lifelong Pilsen resident and printmaker Christopher Urias and his printmaker wife Kathy Steichen. They found their inspiration in lost and recently found family photos of his childhood in Pilsen. Apartments and homes in urban Pilsen in the 1970s and the 2015 Fiesta del Sol neighborhood festival serve as a backdrop for painterly monoprints they created together. Share family, fun, the streets of Pilsen and the lights and scenes of the more than 4 decade old Fiesta del Sol, a neighborhood tradition.

Also on display: Relief and Woodcut Prints from John Pitman Weber (Not Part of the Pilsen Stories Show).

By appointment through November 6 For an appointment call 312 852 7717

November: Joe Hill 100 Years Part 5: Opening November 13th, 6-10pm- collections of the Industrial Workers of the World General HQ's, the collections of the Illinois Labor History Society, and Posters from Molly Crabapple, Special Guests Pocket Guide to Hell’s Paul Durica and Live Joe Hill Music with Bucky Halker.

December: Revisiting Reparations: Afro Colombian Communities: 4th Annual Human Rights Day Show: Opening December 4, 6-10pm and December 11, 6-10pm- featuring Ruth Goring, Michael Bracey, Steve Cagan and Mary Kelsey. Opening discussion moderated by Kari Lydersen







Joyce Owens: Survivor Spirits and Out of the Box

Final Series Month: 40 Acres and a Mule: A Series of Visual Art Shows and Discussions About Reparations for Slavery OPENING September 11, 6-10PM

URI-EICHEN Gallery 2101 South Halsted CHICAGO Illinois 60608 info@URI-EICHEN.com | www.uri-eichen.com

Artist Discussion September 11, 7pm



Owens has a passion about addressing issues she was not taught in schools. She communicates best through visual means. "Survivor Spirits", based on the Slave Narratives, a more than 10-year series of paintings inspired by reading and research in the Library of Congress archives. Another of her series is inspired by W.E.B. DuBois' photography project that he presented at the Paris Exposition of 1900 hoping to end, or shed light on, racial stereotyping (now called profiling).

She is interested in the permutations around race. Generations have lived with undeniable realities that have enormous continuing repercussions based on ludicrous rationales. This is not new, but it is unrelenting so she can't ignore it if she wanted to. She communicates through images, thinking of a time when most people could not read and images told stories that people needed to understand. These themes make a difference to the victims because she shows them in her work, elevating them to art. In her practice she continues to work at enlightening others through paintings, constructions and sculptures, and words. People are changed through art.

Joyce Owens earned degrees from Yale and Howard universities. Owens' work has been exhibited in solo and group exhibitions on four continents including NATO Headquarters in Brussels, the U.S. Embassy in Stockholm and the Phila. Art Museum. She won a 3Arts Award, was honored by Diasporal Rhythms, the African American Arts Alliance, The Helen Winternitz Award in Painting, 1st Prize at Black Creativity, a Ragdale fellowship, and awards from Martin Puryear, Faith Ringgold, Jon Pounds and Artnews and former Chicago SunTimes art critic, Margaret Hawkins, along with commissions and inclusion in major art collections. Owens' work has received positive critical reviews and been the subject of feature articles in numerous national, local and international publications. She has been a juror, panelist, consultant or lecturer at many institutions including universities and colleges. She is a published writer recently contributing to Art Against the Law, edited by Rebecca Zorach and published by the University of Chicago Press this year. www.joyceowens.com

By appointment through October 2. For an appointment call 312 852 7717.

An Evening with John Conroy REPARATIONS NOW: THE CHICAGO FIGHT FOR POLICE TORTURE REPARATIONS:
John Conroy, August 21, 6-10pm

URI-EICHEN Gallery 2101 South Halsted CHICAGO Illinois 60608 info@URI-EICHEN.com | www.uri-eichen.com

The 4th month in the 5 month series: 40 Acres and a Mule: A Series of Visual Art Shows and Discussions about Reparations for Slavery.



August 21, 6-10pm reception with with author John Conroy. Discussion 7pm.

John Conroy is best known for his play, My Kind of Town, his two books (Unspeakable Acts, Ordinary People: The Dynamics of Torture and Belfast Diary: War as a Way of Life), and his extensive and ground-breaking coverage of the Chicago police torture scandal, which involved more than 100 victims. John’s coverage of the scandal ultimately helped to gain pardons for four men who had been sentenced to death and helped free another man who had been wrongfully imprisoned for 26 years. The four who were pardoned sued the city of Chicago, alleging that they had been tortured into confessing to murders they had not committed, and in early 2008, the city settled their suits for $19.8 million. John’s award-winning journalism has been published in newspapers and magazines in the United States, Canada, and the United Kingdom.. He is now an adjunct professor at the DePaul University College of Law teaching the university’s first Fact Investigations course, which he designed.

REPARATIONS NOW: THE CHICAGO FIGHT FOR POLICE TORTURE REPARATIONS

https://www.facebook.com/events/140388242965833/

Join us as we host the archive of activist art created for the recent campaign that won reparations for Chicago police torture survivors. As a result of pressure from a huge grassroots effort, the city council passed an ordinance last May—the first of its kind in the country—that redresses the systemic, racist abuse and sadism perpetrated by officers under the command of Jon Burge. Materials from the fight for reparations and the campaign victory are all on display together for the first time in this exhibition. Artworks, banners, flags, t-shirts, flyers, portable informational pieces, and art used for teach-ins and pop-ups tell the story of a community that rose up, fought together, built a movement ... and won! Join Uri-Eichen to celebrate the art that propelled and inspired the latest campaign (the culmination of decades of struggle and activism), saw the ordinance pass, and an imperfect justice delivered.

Featuring pieces from the Chicago Torture Justice Memorials: Holly Abney, Tw Li, Lucky Pierre, Peter Kuttner, Christine Tarkowski, Carla Mayer and more!

URI-EICHEN Gallery 2101 South Halsted CHICAGO Illinois 60608 info@URI-EICHEN.com | www.uri-eichen.com

By appointment through September 4. For an appointment call 312 852 7717.

REPARATIONS NOW Closing reception. A Mother's Struggle: Resisting Police Torture in Chicago
August 28, 6-10pm

URI-EICHEN Gallery 2101 South Halsted CHICAGO Illinois 60608 info@URI-EICHEN.com | www.uri-eichen.com

The 4th month in the 5 month series: 40 Acres and a Mule: A Series of Visual Art Shows and Discussions about Reparations for Slavery.


Join us for a conversation with Mary L. Johnson, a pioneer in the struggle against police torture in Chicago and the mother of torture survivor Michael Johnson who is serving a life sentence without the possibility of parole. Mary L. Johnson will share her experiences as one of the first to come forward about the racist practices of former Commander Jon Burge and his torture ring of white detectives. In spite of threats from Burge, she continued to speak out about the torture.

Mary L. Johnson was a member of Citizens Alert, the Campaign to Prosecute Police Torture, the Illinois Coalition to End the Death Penalty, and she has been a critical voice in the struggle for justice for all Burge survivors.

This event is part of Black August - Black Women and State Violence (https://www.facebook.com/events/734102943383037/), a series of events that will highlight and lift up the stories and experiences of cis and trans Black women and girls who are/have been targets of state violence. It is also organized in conjunction with the "Reparations Now" exhibit hosted by Uri-Eichen Gallery's 5 month series: 40 Acres and a Mule: A Series of Visual Art Shows and Discussions about Reparations for Slavery The Reparations Now exhibit features activist art from the fight and victory of the campaign for the first in the nation municipal reparations for police torture ordinance. Artwork, banners, flags, t-shirts, portable informational and art pieces used for teach-ins—all on display together for the first time in this exhibition—telling the story of a community that rose up, fought together, built a movement....and won! Join Uri-Eichen to celebrate the art that propelled and inspired the latest campaign that saw the ordinance pass.

By appointment through September 4. For an appointment call 312 852 7717.



REPARATIONS NOW: THE CHICAGO FIGHT FOR
POLICE TORTURE REPARATIONS
OPENING AUGUST 14 6-10PM
Artist Discussion August 14, 7pm

URI-EICHEN Gallery 2101 South Halsted CHICAGO Illinois 60608 info@URI-EICHEN.com | www.uri-eichen.com

The 4th month in the 5 month series: 40 Acres and a Mule: A Series of Visual Art Shows and Discussions about Reparations for Slavery.


Join us as we host the archive of activist art from the fight and victory of the campaign for the first in the nation municipal reparations for police torture ordinance. Thousands of Chicagoans were involved in the years long battle for justice for torture victims.

Artwork, banners, flags, t-shirts, portable informational and art pieces used for teach-ins—all on display together for the first time in this exhibition—telling the story of a community that rose up, fought together, built a movement....and won! Join Uri-Eichen to celebrate the art that propelled and inspired the latest campaign that saw the ordinance pass. Featuring pieces from the Chicago Torture Justice Memorials: Holly Abney, Tw Li, Lucky Pierre, Peter Kuttner, Christine Tarkowski and more!

Check facebook and the web for other Reparations Now events during the month of August!

By appointment through September 4. For an appointment call 312 852 7717.

URI-EICHEN Gallery
2101 South Halsted
CHICAGO Illinois 60608
info@URI-EICHEN.com 

July 10, 6-10pm

Quilombos and the Fight for Reparations in Brazil

The 3rd month in the 5 month series:
40 Acres and a Mule: A Series of Visual Art Shows and Discussions about Reparations for Slavery


URI-EICHEN Gallery 2101 South Halsted
CHICAGO Illinois 60608 info@URI-EICHEN.com
www.uri-eichen.com

Ruth Needleman, professor emerita in labor studies at Indiana University, has led study tours for workers in southern Brazil to learn about social movements, taught graduate classes twice at the Federal University in Fortaleza, and studied social movements, particularly labor and landless workers. A year ago she visited two Quilombos, African descendant communities, and has an upcoming article on “Brazil Recognizes Self-Determination for African Descendants,” in the Journal of Peace & Justice. Currently she teaches Social Movements from a Global Perspective at SAIC.

Michael J. Bracey is a freelance photographer currently residing in Chicago, Illinois. HIs work has been published in various magazines, newspapers, annual reports, and purchased by many private collectors worldwide. He holds an Associates of Arts degree from Hutchinson Community College, Hutchinson, Kansas (1979), a Bachelor of Arts degree in Communications from Webster University, St. Louis, MO (1981), and a Master of Arts degree in Interdisciplinary Arts from Columbia College Chicago (1997).

This exhibit features Ruth’s photos from the two Quilombos, and a broader photo exhibit on Afro-Brazilians by Michael Bracey, from his Americans within the Americas: An Enlightening Visual Voyage. Eleven times more Africans were brought as slaves to Brazil than to the U.S. Never the “racial paradise” imagined by academics and politicians, Brazil’s African descendant population is engaged in parallel struggles for reparations, self-determination and an end to police brutality and genocide. Learn about some of Brazil’s innovative policy initiatives as well as the difficult battles of their historic Black Movement.

Artist Discussion July 10th, 7pm

By appointment through August 7. For an appointment call 312 852 7717.

URI-EICHEN Gallery
2101 South Halsted
CHICAGO Illinois 60608
info@URI-EICHEN.com 



June 12, 6-10pm

Reparations: A Walk Through History Photography of Farrad Ali and Michael Bracey

A photographic exhibition and discussion


URI-EICHEN Gallery 2101 South Halsted
CHICAGO Illinois 60608 info@URI-EICHEN.com
www.uri-eichen.com

Farrad Ali,Chicagoan and president of the Chicago Alliance of African American Photographers, holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Computer Science from Chicago State University, a Master of Science degree in Computer Science from Governors State University, and an MBA from Purdue University Calumet. He is also a graduate of the New York Institute of Photography having received a Certificate In Professional Photography.

Michael J. Bracey is a freelance photographer currently residing in Chicago, Illinois. HIs work has been published in various magazines, newspapers, annual reports, and purchased by many private collectors worldwide. He holds an Associates of Arts degree from Hutchinson Community College, Hutchinson, Kansas (1979), a Bachelor of Arts degree in Communications from Webster University, St. Louis, MO (1981), and a Master of Arts degree in Interdisciplinary Arts from Columbia College Chicago (1997).

Join us for a show of the work of these two photographers' paths--travels through Western Africa and home, here in Chicago.

Artist Discussion 7pm

URI-EICHEN Gallery
2101 South Halsted
CHICAGO Illinois 60608
info@URI-EICHEN.com 

By Appointment through Friday, July 3. For an appointment call 312 852 7717



Closing Reception Joe Hill 100 Years Part 4: May 1, 6-9pm

Featuring : "F.B. Eyes: How J. Edgar Hoover's Ghostreaders Framed African American Literature." author William J. Maxwell. Join us as we launch our series on reparations for slavery with this May Day event.


William J. Maxwell is associate professor of English and African American Studies at Washington University in St. Louis, where he teaches modern American and African American literatures. He's the author of the award-winning book "New Negro, Old Left: African American Writing and Communism between the Wars" (Columbia University Press) and the editor of the first-ever collection of the "Complete Poems" of Harlem Renaissance pioneer Claude McKay (University of Illinois Press). In February, Princeton University Press published his latest book, based on over a hundred FOIA requests: "F.B. Eyes: How J. Edgar Hoover's Ghostreaders Framed African American Literature. At first glance, few institutions seem more opposed than African American literature and J. Edgar Hoover’s white-bread Federal Bureau of Investigation. But behind the scenes the FBI’s hostility to black protest was energized by fear of and respect for black writing. Drawing on nearly 14,000 pages of newly released FBI files,"F.B. Eyes: How J. Edgar Hoover's Ghostreaders Framed African American Literature" exposes the Bureau’s intimate policing of five decades of black poems, plays, essays, and novels. Starting in 1919, year one of Harlem’s renaissance and Hoover’s career at the Bureau, secretive FBI “ghostreaders” monitored the latest developments in African American letters. By the time of Hoover’s death in 1972, these ghostreaders knew enough to simulate a sinister black literature of their own. The official aim behind the Bureau’s close reading was to anticipate political unrest. Yet, as "F.B. Eyes" reveals, FBI surveillance came to influence the creation and public reception of African American literature in the heart of the twentieth century.



More about Jorge Franklin Cardenas:

“Standing tall in its place, Madrid awaited [the fascist invasion] with a spirit saturated with courage, ready to die if necessary, without a single thought of vile surrender or easy defeat ever crossing its mind. All the faces demonstrated the seriousness of the situation, and there was not any trace of fear visible. Next to the brave Madrilenos stood the entire Republic: people from Cataluna, the Basque region, from Andalucia, Extremadura, Valencia… and Castilla and Leon, and Galicia, representing all of Spain, they formed a wall to stop the unleashed assault of the fascist beast whose roar could be heard and whose claws had begun to tear painfully but not fatally at the city’s doors.” Jorge Franklin, In Madrid now for ten years: Madrid’s Resistance

The well-known artist and caricaturist George Franklin was born Jorge Daniel Julio Franklin de Cárdenas on October 17, 1910, in Bogota, Colombia, of a North American father and a South American mother, Maria Josefa Cárdenas, from a prominent family in Santa Marta, Colombia. The family lived for some time near her parents in Santa Marta.

It was in Santa Marta that one of the cataclysmic events that shaped Jorge’s life and strongly influenced his art occurred: A month long strike of banana workers in that region culminated on December 5, 1928, with a vicious attack by the army, which barricaded a Sunday gathering of workers and their families in the plaza, sprayed gunfire into the crowd from the four corners of the square, and killed hundreds, if not thousands of innocent workers, including women and children, creating a world-wide scandal. The soldiers threw bodies into the sea so the exact number could never be determined. Estimates from survivors range from 800 to 3000.

Jorge studied in Bogota until 1930 when he traveled to Spain for further training. He enrolled in the Royal Academy of Fine Art in Madrid. While still in school, he worked with the republican opposition to Franco, drawing anti-Franco cartoons for the anarchist union paper Solidaridad Obrera, Upon Franco’s rise to the presidency in 1939, Jorge was seized by the Falangist army, accused of drawing “socialist” caricatures and cartoons, and was sentenced to death. With intercession by the Colombian Consul General, Jorge was finally released. He returned to Bogota in 1941.

Even after his ordeal in prison, Jorge could not resist using his art as a gentle but forceful declaration of the world-wide struggle for human rights, and he continued to publish his cartoons and caricatures. The wry humor evident in his work, especially in his 1943 comic strip, ‘Prisoner Little Stripes’ (El Preso Reyitas), depicting the Little Prisoner’s imaginative plots for escape, is a subtle but nonetheless vehement protest against inequality and injustice. In 1946 he co-founded the magazine ‘Semana’, and drew caricatures for the magazine’s covers until after his departure from Colombia.

Jorge was caught up in civil unrest once again, when Jorge Eliécer Gaitán, the liberal candidate for president, was assassinated on April 9, 1948. Reportedly, a violent mob grabbed the alleged assassin from the police guards and ripped him apart on the street. Twelve hours of rioting followed, known as the ‘Bogotazo,’ during which every building in the capital city of Bogota was set afire. Although for a while afterwards Bogota remained relatively calm, the rioting caused by the assassination of Gaitan, coupled with the existing discontent of the workers in the countryside, spread into the rural areas and became known as ‘La Violencia,’ the bloodiest civil war in South American history. Unfortunately, there was no ‘right side’ for Jorge’s cartoons and caricatures, so in October of 1948 he fled to the United States, determined to lead a quieter life with his wife and two young children. He continued his artistic career first in Chicago and then in Miami Beach until his death in 1997.

Jorge’s son George and his wife knew little of Jorge’s life history until after his death, when his daughter-in-law Stephanie inherited the archives of his work. Jorge’s passionate belief in human rights, the extent of his fame, and the enormous respect accorded him by his associates and critics alike, are evidenced in the many articles and reviews of his work. An artist of unmistakable style, his work was exhibited in Spain, Colombia, and in Chicago and Miami in the United States, and has been published in numerous periodicals, magazines, reviews and books in many parts of the world. He was awarded prizes for his work in all three countries, where he was always inspired by the struggles of working people, the need for freedom of the mind and of democracy for the soul of man.

#######

Quotes:

It has been said that humor is the highest refinement of intelligence. Jorge Franklin has chosen this difficult means to express himself. With his unmistakable style, Franklin has been able to convey his feelings through the faces of personalities, combining talent and humor in a very fortunate way.

Roberto Garcia A., Consul General of Colombia in the United States (In Miami)

Caricature has a life of its own; it can express that autonomy when it is the product of one of the most creative minds. From: Supplement of the “Caribe," from announcement of exhibit at the Institute of Culture in Santa Marta Colombia, SA 1979

#######

Below is from: http://www.semana.com/especiales/articulo/el-humor-es-cosa-seria/36272-3
ESPECIALES | 1998/06/22 (an article published in SEMANA June 22, 1998, found Mar. 3, 2015)

EL HUMOR ES COSA SERIA
De Pepe Mexía a Héctor Osuna, los caricaturistas han sido comentaristas de excepción del acontecer político y social de Colombia en el siglo XX.

HUMOR IS SERIOUS THING by Pepe Mexía Hector Osuna,
First sentence:
‘Se ha dicho que la caricatura primero hizo reír, luego ver y finalmente pensar.’ Translation:
“It has been said that the cartoon first makes one laugh, then watch and finally think.”

[from the last paragraph in the 3rd section:]
Cartoonists have been exceptional commentators on political and social events in Colombia in the twentieth century. The 40s left its mark on a generation that was in open rejection of classical art, and had a deep interest in forms of expression related to the Impressionist movement, Dada and Cubism. George Franklin was one of their representatives. In the way he manipulated the appearance in his caricatures, his cartooning was revolutionary, and there was no protagonist in public life that had not been reflected in his cubes, polyhedra, triangles and rectangles. His first published caricatures were in Universidad, the magazine directed by Germán Arciniegas, and once the refuge of artists and intellectuals, but his most outstanding works appear in El Tiempo, and in SEMANA, and where with Max Henríquez, he made the covers of the magazine a symbol of the era. While caricature is an obvious distortion, his place in the history of the genre has to do, above all, with his talent in fashioning one that expresses the character of the subject..
So much so that there are some who believe that with Franklin ended the era of the sublime portrait.

A biography of him at the end of this article: Jorge Franklin (1912) [He was born in 1910] Born in Bogotá, he began his studies in the School of Fine Arts, and in Spain continued his specialization in the Academy San Fernando, Madrid. He began his foray into the world of cartoons in the magazine University, led by Germán Arciniegas. The Spanish civil war prevented him from finishing his studies and he traveled to Barcelona, where he worked as an artist doing drawings for the the magazine Solidaridad Obrera. His relationship with this publication took him to prison at the hands of Franco's army in 1939. He was even sentenced to death but the sentence was not met because of the intervention of the Colombia consulate. Back in the country in the 40s, he became a partner in El Tiempo and began to use his talent on its appearance, influenced by the avant-garde trends, including Cubism. After performing an acclaimed solo exhibition, he became a SEMANA collaborator and made his cover a symbol of the publication. In 1950 [It was in October 1948] he traveled to America, where he currently lives.

[He did a caricature on every cover, weekly, of SEMANA, from the first issue in October of 1946 until the end of 1948, when he left quickly in the middle of the night, first to Mexico, and then to the United States. There were a few of his caricatures published on some of the covers after that. Perhaps there were already some in their files after he left, or perhaps he sent some from the US.]

More on James Wechsler’s Freedom of Information:

James Wechsler’s recent work takes as its subject documents obtained during his art historical research on connections between modernism and Communism. Requested through the Freedom of Information Act, a 1966 law that increased public access to the records and archives of government-run agencies such as the F.B.I., such documents, many of them recently de-classified, are often consulted by scholars to shed light on the government surveillance of suspected Communist sympathizers during the height of the Cold War. In total, they reveal a remarkable network of covert operations undertaken by the F.B.I., closely supervised by its long-time director J. Edgar Hoover, to monitor the movement and activities of American citizens and foreign nationals with left-leaning political views, including many well-known visual and performing artists. The atmosphere of suspicion and paranoia that enabled such policies was perhaps best exemplified by Senator Joseph McCarthy and his public diatribes in the early 1950s against those he suspected of Communist sympathies, and the work of the House Un-American Activities Committee that interrogated many well-known artists, writers, and entertainers over a much longer span of time, including the great African-American actor, orator, and Spingarn Medal recipient Paul Robeson, who features prominently in this exhibition.

The Documents that are the source for Wechsler’s paintings conceal rather than reveal their subjects. Instead of providing the sort of “information” that a would-be researcher would hope to find, they engage in a tortuous game of evasion that transforms readers of a purported text into viewers forced to negotiate a dense thicket of diagrammatic marks, hand-drawn lines, obscure symbols, stamps, and—most prominently of all—impenetrable blotches of redacted content. A text that at one time might have provided answers—names, places, dates—has been mercilessly transmogrified by a byzantine network of depersonalized government procedures into an unintentional work of “art,” the collaborative product of a series of anonymous bureaucrats.

The Paintings themselves call attention to the very techniques of obfuscation employed by government censors to impede the transmission (and freedom of) information. To this end, Wechsler takes advantage of the productively ambiguous position of his source material, which hovers between textual and visual means of address. He magnifies the scale of the documents, embeds them in a field of modulated colors, and blurs or occasionally omits entirely the legible parts of their original text. This amplifies the visual punch of the redactions themselves, but also deftly diffuses their potency. No longer securely coupled to the text that they were intended to nullify, the oppressive power of the redactions disintegrates precisely because they are now, in Wechsler’s work, successfully dis-integrated from their original mission and released into the realm of aesthetics, set before the public as abstract forms open to free and unimpeded critical analysis. Gestures once intended to cover-up meaning and identity are now, in Wechsler’s art, made to defiantly declare the re-inscribed presence of their human subjects.

--Guy Jordan, Assistant Professor Art History,
Department of Art, Western Kentucky University

April 10

Joe Hill 100 Years Part 4: Paintings from James Wechsler and Cartoons and Paintings from Jorge Franklin Cardenas

Opening April 10, 6-10pm

Join us as we feature two artists working on themes of social justice. James Wechsler’s Freedom of Information series of modern paintings on historical FBI repression of Americans on the left and Jorge Franklin Cardenas’s comics, paintings and writing about worker rights and his imprisonment for “making fun of Francisco Franco” after the Republican loss of Spanish Civil War. Much of the original Franklin Cardenas work hanging in the gallery has never been shown before. Join us as we celebrate the work of two artists standing proud to fight for freedom of speech, just like Joe Hill!


URI-EICHEN Gallery | facebook.com/URIEICHENGallery2101Halsted 2101 South Halsted
Chicago

OPENING PROGRAMS:

7pm-8pm: Panel discussion- Using Satire and Parody in Political Expression: featuring Rick Perlstein, Gary Huck, Jerry Boyle and moderated by Paul Durica

9pm-10pm Mark Dvorak plays the songs of Joe Hill!

All events are free and open to the public

URI-EICHEN Gallery 2101 South Halsted CHICAGO Illinois 60608
info@URI-EICHEN.com
www.uri-eichen.com

By Appointment through Friday, May 1. For an appointment call 312 852 7717

Closing Reception Joe Hill 100 Years Part 4: May 1, 6-9pm featuring : "F.B. Eyes: How J. Edgar Hoover's Ghostreaders Framed African American Literature" author William J. Maxwell. Join us as we launch our series on reparations for slavery with this May Day event.

Jorge Franklin Cardenas (1910-1998) was born in Columbia. He was the son of an American father and Columbian mother. He traveled to Spain before the Spanish Civil War to study art. He was an active member of the National Confederation of Labor, affiliated with the socialists, and actively supported the proposed establishment of the Spanish Republic. When Franco’s army was victorious, he was arrested for his affiliation with the Republicans. Tried and sentenced to death, the intervention of the Colombian consul in Spain saved his life. Franklin returned to Colombia in 1941, and married Graciela Padilla Pachon, with whom he had two children. The archive of his work, just organized this Spring by his Hyde Park, Chicago daughter in law, Stephanie Franklin, inspired Joe Hill Part 100 Years Part 4. His caricatures of John Lewis and Che Guervara, his cartoons and ink drawings on display some for the first time, some for the first time in 40 years, capture the spirit of Joe Hill. Join us to celebrate the unsung hero of progressive art

James Wechsler, New York, works on the subject of government repression. His paintings, the series Freedom of Information is based on actual documents from the FBI’s Cold War era files on artists, performers, and writers. Since these sources were so heavily redacted, the resulting works confound the conventional notions of portraiture – concealing rather than revealing identity – and history painting – frustrating instead of furthering our attempts to make sense of the past. By exhuming this buried, troubled history, this series provokes questions about censorship, surveillance and the culture of fear. Beyond such explicit commentaries, they also evoke deeper psychological and existential questions about perception and the construction of meaning from fragmentary, partially decipherable artifacts. One of Wechsler’s paintings is on the cover of F.B. Eyes: How J. Edgar Hoover’s Ghostreaders Framed African American Literature by William J. Maxwell




March 13

Killed

Opening March 13th, 6-10pm

8PM, March 13th: Special Guest Speaker Tom Burke. Tom Burke is a labor and international solidarity activist from a large Irish American family in Chicago. He witnessed the British war in Ireland and supports Irish freedom.


URI-EICHEN Gallery | facebook.com/URIEICHENGallery2101Halsted 2101 South Halsted
Chicago

Colm McCarthy is an Irish photographer and printmaker whose work focuses primarily on sociopolitical commentary. He currently lives with his wife Jane and their family in Madison, Wisconsin.


Since its "official" beginnings in 1969, the conflict in Northern Ireland claimed the lives of over 3,500 people. Of those killed, approximately 275 were children under the age of 17.


Colm began working on "Killed" in late 2008, as a means of dealing with the death of his own father. Memories of childhood holidays in Northern Ireland led to voracious bouts of reading and research into the victims of the "Troubles" (as the conflict was known in Ireland). He felt the need to undertake a portrait project that would somehow convey the enormous sense of loss from this conflict. Mainly to busy himself and get his mind off his own grief. But 3,500 people was unfathomable to him. And then he began to focus just on the children, and decided to use them as a representative sample that could encompass all parties affected by the conflict.

He felt it was vital to separate these children from the violence that surrounded them. He did not want the series to be political. And so, with non-existent resources, He tried to research as much as he could about each child, and depict them with something that was of importance to them ( he was not always successful at this - sometimes the instruments of violence would find their way into the final image). He wanted to show them as they were - youthful, optimistic, happy and very much alive. Learning about each child made it all the more difficult to paint them. This is partly why the project continues at such a slow pace. Between 2008 and 2014 he has only managed to complete 15 portraits.

"Killed" is not intended to make any political statement. It does not seek to elicit anger or inflame. It is about life and love and loss, catharsis and healing, and the futility of violence, not just in Ireland, but here and everywhere. But in the end it's mostly about love.

By Appointment through Friday April 3rd. For an appointment call 312 852 7717

Upcoming Shows:


April: Joe Hill 100 Years Part 4: James Wechsler

May - September: Series on Reparations for Slavery

October: Chicago Artist Month and Pilsen Open Studios

November: Joe Hill 100 Years Part 5

December: Human Rights Day Show

March 6

Seeing Red

Closing Reception March 6th, 6-9pm


URI-EICHEN Gallery | facebook.com/URIEICHENGallery2101Halsted 2101 South Halsted
Chicago


Gary Huck is political cartoonist for the United Electrical, Radio and Machine Workers of America (UE), an independent, progressive, national union based in Pittsburgh, PA. Gary is the only cartoonist employed full-time by a union in the U.S. His work has appeared in Business Week, the Washington Post, and The Center for American Progress and a wide range of other publications. He has exhibited nationally and internationally, including the 1199 Gallery, New York City, The Salon of Cartoon Art, San Antonio, Cuba, The Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh, PA, The Mattress Factory Museum, Pittsburgh, PA and The Museum of Cartoon Art, San Francisco, CA.

Huck and Konopacki’s original cartoons are in the permanent collection of New York University’s Tamiment Institute Library & Robert F. Wagner Labor Archives. Mike Konopacki graduated from the University of Wisconsin in 1974 with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Political Science. He began labor cartooning for the Madison Press Connection, a local daily created by striking newspaper workers in 1978. In 1983 he and Gary Huck created Huck/Konopacki Labor Cartoons, syndicating their cartoons to the labor press in the U.S. and Canada.

Since that time they have published six collections of labor cartoons, Bye! American, THEM, MAD in USA, Working Class Hero, Two Headed Space Alien Shrinks Labor Movementt and the latest American Dread. With Alec Dubro Mike has written and drawn comic books and comics on the World Bank, welfare reform and union organizing.

Mike is co-author and illustrator of Howard Zinn’s graphic history A People’s History of American Empire. In May of 2009 Mike earned his Master of Arts from the University of Wisconsin – Madison Art Department. In 2010, Mike completed his Master of Fine Arts from the UW-Madison.


February 13

Seeing Red

Opening February 13th, 6-10pm



URI-EICHEN Gallery | facebook.com/URIEICHENGallery2101Halsted 2101 South Halsted
Chicago

Program February 13th, 8pm- Get Out the Vote Chicago! Political Poster Collage Workshop with Mike Konopacki and Gary Huck



Gary Huck is political cartoonist for the United Electrical, Radio and Machine Workers of America (UE), an independent, progressive, national union based in Pittsburgh, PA. Gary is the only cartoonist employed full-time by a union in the U.S. His work has appeared in Business Week, the Washington Post, and The Center for American Progress and a wide range of other publications. He has exhibited nationally and internationally, including the 1199 Gallery, New York City, The Salon of Cartoon Art, San Antonio, Cuba, The Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh, PA, The Mattress Factory Museum, Pittsburgh, PA and The Museum of Cartoon Art, San Francisco, CA.

Huck and Konopacki’s original cartoons are in the permanent collection of New York University’s Tamiment Institute Library & Robert F. Wagner Labor Archives.

Mike Konopacki graduated from the University of Wisconsin in 1974 with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Political Science. He began labor cartooning for the Madison Press Connection, a local daily created by striking newspaper workers in 1978. In 1983 he and Gary Huck created Huck/Konopacki Labor Cartoons, syndicating their cartoons to the labor press in the U.S. and Canada.

Since that time they have published six collections of labor cartoons, Bye! American, THEM, MAD in USA, Working Class Hero, Two Headed Space Alien Shrinks Labor Movementt and the latest American Dread. With Alec Dubro Mike has written and drawn comic books and comics on the World Bank, welfare reform and union organizing.

Mike is co-author and illustrator of Howard Zinn’s graphic history A People’s History of American Empire. In May of 2009 Mike earned his Master of Arts from the University of Wisconsin – Madison Art Department. In 2010, Mike completed his Master of Fine Arts from the UW-Madison.



February 6

Closing Reception, People at Work

February 6, 6-9pm.



URI-EICHEN Gallery | facebook.com/URIEICHENGallery2101Halsted 2101 South Halsted
Chicago



Michael Gaylord James began shooting pictures of people and places in and around Chicago; it emerged as a serious pursuit when, at 20 he shot film of a 1962 motorcycle adventure to Mexico. There he caught a glimpse of President Kennedy, a moment he captured in a photo he exhibited nearly thirty years later in his first show, Mexico 1962: the Mexican Odyssey of Senior Miguel Gaylord James.

Since then he has had a camera with him everywhere he went: on many road trips across the USA, throughout years as a the co-founder and co-director of Heartland Café, and on trips to the USSR, Ireland, Cuba, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Mexico, and South Africa.

One thing that always grabs his attention—a theme in his work for more than 50 years—are scenes of people on the job. The photos are selected from a broader group -- Pictures from the Long Haul.

This collection includes a myriad of images of people at their workplaces and doing their job. You’ll see Kennedy in a motorcade, Muddy Waters and James Cotton playing a 1962 gig, restaurant and kitchen workers from Chicago to Mexico, mechanics, cashiers, dancers, and people in garages, markets, bakeries, sugar cane processing plants, and more.

All events are free and open to the public!

For more info gabbyfish@hotmail.com. Show open by by appointment through February 6, 2015. For an appointment call 312 852 7717



January 9

People at Work Photographs by Michael Gaylord James

Opening January 9th, 6-10pm.



URI-EICHEN Gallery | facebook.com/URIEICHENGallery2101Halsted 2101 South Halsted
Chicago

Artist Discussion 8pm



Michael Gaylord James began shooting pictures of people and places in and around Chicago; it emerged as a serious pursuit when, at 20 he shot film of a 1962 motorcycle adventure to Mexico. There he caught a glimpse of President Kennedy, a moment he captured in a photo he exhibited nearly thirty years later in his first show, Mexico 1962: the Mexican Odyssey of Senior Miguel Gaylord James.

Since then he has had a camera with him everywhere he went: on many road trips across the USA, throughout years as a the co-founder and co-director of Heartland Café, and on trips to the USSR, Ireland, Cuba, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Mexico, and South Africa.

One thing that always grabs his attention—a theme in his work for more than 50 years—are scenes of people on the job. The photos are selected from a broader group -- Pictures from the Long Haul.

This collection includes a myriad of images of people at their workplaces and doing their job. You’ll see Kennedy in a motorcade, Muddy Waters and James Cotton playing a 1962 gig, restaurant and kitchen workers from Chicago to Mexico, mechanics, cashiers, dancers, and people in garages, markets, bakeries, sugar cane processing plants, and more.

All events are free and open to the public!

Closing reception February 6, 2015 - 6-9

For more info gabbyfish@hotmail.com. Show open by by appointment through February 6, 2015. For an appointment call 312 852 7717



December 12

3rd Annual Human Rights Day Show: Chicago Alliance of African American Photographers.

Opening 6-10pm

Topics covered in the exhibition include:

  • - Trayvon Martin protests

  • - Chicago Violence

  • - Chicago Torture

  • - Reparations

  • - The Million Man March (1995) and how it is relevant today

  • - Detroit Water Shutoffs


Photographers: Chandra Abernathy, Farrad Ali, Michael Bracey, Abena Sharon Dale, Gerard Evans, Larry Redmond, Duane Savage, Crystal Wiley-Brown

URI-EICHEN Gallery | facebook.com/URIEICHENGallery2101Halsted 2101 South Halsted
Chicago

Group Show Artist Discussion 8pm
Live Music with Kara Jackson 9pm


The mission of the Chicago Alliance of African-American Photographers is:

- To photographically document the culture, society, and history of African-Americans, its communities, residents and their ethnic exchange in the Greater Chicago area and throughout the world.

- To promote the work of professional and amateur photographers through sponsored exhibitions, publications, lectures and education in the field of photography, and its related genre.

- To Use our photographic images and expertise to inform the public and our community about the importance of photography as an informative and creative medium of expression. http://www.caaap.org

All events are free and open to the public!

For more info gabbyfish@hotmail.com. Chicago Alliance of African American Photographers Human Rights Day Show open by appointment through January 2, 2015- for an appointment call 312 852 7717

Special thanks to Farrad Ali and Larry Redmond!

November 14

Joe Hill 100 Years Part 3- LABOR / MIGRANT / GULF Group Show.

Opening November 14th 6-10pm, 2 Venues, next door to each other!

URI-EICHEN Gallery | facebook.com/URIEICHENGallery2101Halsted 2101 S Halsted and 2107 S Halsted
Chicago


Labor Migrant Gulf is a comprehensive art exhibit featuring nearly 100 artists, bringing awareness to the migrant working poor in the Persian/Arabian Gulf, the US –Mexican border and throughout the world. This exhibit, born in the United States, is inspired by laborers half way around the world, while keeping a clear eye on regional borders in the Western Hemisphere. A significant goal of Labor Migrant Gulf is to integrate new works and actions by artists in the towns and cities where it travels.

The exhibit’s center pieces are two boteh created by over 70 artists from San Diego, New York, Chicago, Minneapolis, Mexico City, Tijuana, Berlin, Milan, Beirut, Paris, Rome, Dubai, Toronto, Vancouver, Hawai’i and Los Angeles. Labor Migrant Gulf began as a contribution to Gulf Labor, based in New York to protest the building of cultural institutions such as the Guggenheim and Louvre in Abu Dhabi on the backs of migrant labor.

Featuring Live Music with Bucky Halker, playing Joe Hill music! Joe Hill -the worker, the singer, artist, and fighter for labor rights: join us for a night of his music surrounded by LABOR / MIGRANT / GULF. Music 8pm

Title: Fist of the Day
Medium: Silk screen print
Dimensions: 36” x 24”
Artist: Hend Al Mansour
Year: 2014


All events are free and open to the public!

Participating Artists:


Dan Adams, San Diego, California
Andrew Alcasid, San Diego, California
Mia Alexander, San Diego, California
Hend Al Mansour, Minneapolis, MN
Karina Bania, San Diego, California
Jennifer Bennett, San Diego, California
Sean Boyd, San Marcos, California
Melissa Chimera, Maui, Hawai’i
Lora ChauDavis, San Diego, California
Maria ChauDavis, San Diego, California
Richard ChauDavis, San Diego, California
Janet Cooling, Durham, North Carolina
Rowshan Dowlatabadi, San Diego, California
Hector Duarte, Chicago
Christian Garcia-Olivo, San Diego, California
Eric J. Garcia, Chicago, Illinois
Matilde Gattoni, Milan, Italy
Angela Gonzalez, Tijuana, Mexico
Matt Greco, New York
Hank Gross, San Diego, California
Becky Guttin, La Jolla, California/Mexico City
Jillian Hall, San Diego, California
Judit Hersko, San Diego, California
Hill&Stump, San Diego, California
Jill Marie Holslin, Tijuana, Mexico
Prudence Horne, San Diego, California
Adeeb Maki, San Diego, California
Bhavna Mehta, San Diego, California
Teresa Mills, Lakeside, California
Anne Mudge, Elfin Forest, California
Kim Niehans, San Diego, California
Meegan Nolan, Lemon Grove, California
A. Michelle Page, Santa Monica, California
Gabriel Rauch, San Diego, California
Leoangelo Reyes, San Diego, California
Vallo Riberto, San Diego, California
Rebecca Romani
Michael Ruiz, San Diego, California
Jayce Salloum, Vancouver, Canada
Gail Schneider, San Diego, California
Miriam Sievers, San Diego, California
Gregory Sholette, New York, New York
Nouha Sinno, Venice, California
Lauren Siry, San Diego, California
Melissa Smedley, Salinas, California
Ruth Wallen, San Diego, California
John Pitman Weber, Chicago, Illinois
Anna Zappoli, San Diego, California
Peggy Zask, San Diego, California

Al DiFranco Studio 2107 S Halsted: From Arceo Press "Rostros de la Migracion" (Faces of the Migration); "Borrando la Raya" (Erasing the Line), from Consejo Grafico; "From Where We Stand We see No Borders" portfolio from Obrero Press. The work includes linoleum-cut reliefs, serigraphy, etching and mixed media.

Participating artists:

Saul Aguirre
Jose Antonio Aguirre
Montserrat Alsina
Rene Arceo
Carlos Barbarena
Steve Berman
Mario Castillo
Melanie Cervantes
Sam Coronado
Antonio Pepe Coronado
Marcos Dimas
Bro. Mark Elder
Roberto Ferreyra
Juan Fuentes
Cristian Flores
Esperanza Gama
Jose Guerrero
Kimberley Grove
Juan Guerrero Calderon (Morelia, MX)
Carlos Jackson
Salvador Jimenez
Edgar Lopez (IN)
Alexy Javier Lanza
Jesus Macarena
Oscar Moya (El Paso)
Luis Montenegro
Poli Marichal (LA)
Dolores Mercado
Don Newton
Art Olson
Antonio Pazaran
Katherine Perryman
Cristian Pineda
John Pitman Weber
Tiger Reed
Elvia Rodriguez Ochoa
Ramiro Rodriguez
Marianne Sadowski
Erik Salgado
Francisco Siqueiros
Gabriel Villa

For more info gabbyfish@hotmail.com. Joe Hill 100 Years Part 3- LABOR / MIGRANT / GULF open by appointment through December 3- for an appointment call 312 852 7717

Special thanks to Doris Bittar of Gulf Labor West and John Pittman Weber for bringing this important show to URI-EICHEN.



October 24

Join Us! Friday, October 24th for Following the Box

Following the Box - an Evening with Jerry Zbiral and Alan Teller facebook.com/URIEICHENGallery2101Halsted

Friday, Oct. 24, 7pm-9pm

A chance discovery of a box of photographs from India in 1945 launches a quest to identify the photographer and to the creation of new artworks with both American and Indian artists. Alan Teller and Jerri Zbiral recount a fascinating cross-cultural journey, following Ghurka soldiers in rural India and passionate discussions with West Bengali artists as they draw inspirations from an outsider’s vision of 70 years ago.

How a mysterious box of photos sent an Evanston couple halfway around the world

URI-EICHEN Gallery
2101 S Halsted
Chicago

For a quarter century, Jerri Zbiral and Alan Teller have been trying to figure out the identity of the photographer behind images from 1940s India.... Hear the unfolding story and see the images from the mysterious box!

Join us for this special one night event. Snacks served! All events are free and open to the public! If you have questions, please call 312 852 7717 or email at gabbyfish@hotmail.com

For more information about Following the Box please check out: followingthebox@gmail.com

All events are free and open to the public!



Pilsen Open Studios Openings:

Saturday, October 18 from 12 to 8pm,
and Sunday, October 19, 2014, from 12 to 6pm

The New Way of War: the Expansion of Drones and Seeking Sanctuary

Kathy Steichen and Christopher Urias facebook.com/URIEICHENGallery2101Halsted

One of a Kind Monoprints of Archival Commercial Foil and Collage
URI-EICHEN Gallery
2101 S Halsted
Chicago

URI-EICHEN Gallery hosts an exhibit about the expanding use of drones. On our border, in other countries, and here at home, drones have posed a real threat to privacy, to freedom, and as a weapon of war. The monoprints on display, about drone use in war and here in the U.S. explore the growing use of the weapon and surveillance drone. Drone victims speak of seeking sanctuary of a cloudy day somewhere in a country targeted by the U.S. so that the drones cannot fly or of immigrants crossing the Mexican / U.S. border seek sanctuary in America, only to be stopped by the observance of a drone, piloted thousands of miles away.

October 10

The New Way of War: the Expansion of Drones and Seeking Sanctuary

Kathy Steichen and Christopher Urias facebook.com/URIEICHENGallery2101Halsted

One of a Kind Monoprints of Archival Commercial Foil and Collage

October 10, 6-10pm Chicago Artists Month Opening

URI-EICHEN Gallery
2101 S Halsted
Chicago

URI-EICHEN Gallery hosts an exhibit about the expanding use of drones. On our border, in other countries, and here at home, drones have posed a real threat to privacy, to freedom, and as a weapon of war. The monoprints on display, about drone use in war and here in the U.S. explore the growing use of the weapon and surveillance drone. Drone victims speak of seeking sanctuary of a cloudy day somewhere in a country targeted by the U.S. so that the drones cannot fly or of immigrants crossing the Mexican / U.S. border seek sanctuary in America, only to be stopped by the observance of a drone, piloted thousands of miles away.

8pm Special Guest Speaker Kathy Kelly from Voices for Creative Nonviolence and short film screening: Walking the Walk: A March Against Drone Warfare

About Kathy Kelly: She co-coordinates Voices for Creative Nonviolence (www.vcnv.org), a campaign to end U.S. military and economic warfare. During each of nine recent trips to Afghanistan, Kathy Kelly, as an invited guest of the Afghan Peace Volunteers, has lived alongside ordinary Afghan people in a working class neighborhood in Kabul. She and her companions in Voices for Creative Nonviolence believe that “where you stand determines what you see.” Kelly has also joined with activists in various regions of the country to protest drone warfare by holding demonstrations outside of U.S. military bases in Nevada, upstate New York, and, most recently, at Whiteman Air Force base in Missouri.

Pilsen Open Studios Openings:

Saturday, October 18 from 12 to 8pm, and Sunday, October 19, 2014, from 12 to 6pm

Special Event October 24, 7pm-9pm Following the Box: Jerri Zbiral and Allan Teller

MAY-SEPTEMBER

2014 Global Human Rights and Economic Justice Series- Join us for the final series month!

September 12, 6-10pm facebook.com/URIEICHENGallery2101Halsted

An exhibition of 58 posters from campaigns using economic pressure to secure people’s rights and achieve justice, including:


BOYCOTT! The Art of Economic Activism

URI-EICHEN Gallery
2101 S Halsted
Chicago

From American Friends Service Committee and the Center for the Study of Political Graphics, LA

2014 Global Human Rights and Economic Justice Series- Join us for the final series month!

All events are free and open to the public!

An exhibition of 58 posters from campaigns using economic pressure to secure people’s rights and achieve justice, including:

• United Farm Worker grape and lettuce boycott
• Anti-Apartheid Movement
• Anti-Sweatshop campaigns
• Palestinian call for Boycott, Divest and Sanctions (BDS)
• And many other campaigns

BOYCOTTS ! September 12 at 8pm Opening panel discussion.

Moderated by Bob Bruno, Director of the Labor Studies Program at the University of Illinois. Featuring Emily Twarog (US Boycotts), Anne Carlson (CPS Testing Boycott), Discussion of Willis Wagons Boycott and film Screening of work in progress by Kartemquin Films, after the panel.

About the panel:

Robert Bruno, Director of the Labor Studies Program and a Professor of Labor and Employment Relations at the University of Illinois, wrote Steelworker Alley: How Class Works In Youngstown(1999), Reforming the Chicago Teamsters: The Story of Local 705 (2003) and Justified by Work: The Meaning of Faith in Chicago’s Working-Class Churches (2008) a he has taught many different labor relations courses, specializing in collective bargaining, labor history and American politics, as well as given numerous public presentations on labor relations.

Dr. Emily E. LB. Twarog is an assistant professor of history and labor studies at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign’s School of Labor and Employment Relations – Labor Education Program. Emily spent 15 years in the food service industry as a line cook, drive-thru cashier, assistant pastry chef, bread baker, and server. She is currently at work on a book (“Politics in the Pantry: Housewives, Food, and Consumer Protest in 20th Century America”) that examines the ways in which housewives in America used food protests as a political tool to gain political influence both locally and nationally.

Anne Carlson teaches a combined class of 4th, 5th, and 6th graders at Drummond Montessori Magnet, where she is also the CTU delegate. She has taught in CPS since 1998. Before becoming a Montessori-trained teacher, she worked as a dual-language (Spanish) instructor. She is also a parent of three children, two of whom attend her school. In February 2014, following the lead of Saucedo Academy, she organized a boycott, with some teachers at Drummond, of the Illinois State Achievement Test (ISAT).

Kartemquin Films Presents a 20 minute work in progress: '63 Boycott- After the panel discussion, a screening of this work in progress. This short documentary and web project that highlights the stories of participants in the 1963 Chicago Public School (CPS) Boycott, one of the largest Civil Rights’ demonstrations in the city’s history. Through never-released 16mm footage and then-and-now interviews with participants, the project engages the broader public in the importance of this largely forgotten event and connects it to the struggles surrounding today’s public education system. This film serves as a platform to discuss the significance of contemporary education reform issues in Chicago.

For more info, email gabbyfish@hotmail.com Open by appointment through October 3rd-- for an appointment call 312 852 7717

AUGUST 2014

Anya Ulinich presents Lena Finkle's Magic Barrel, a graphic novel about dating, love, sex, immigration, motherhood, literature, and the meaning of life.

August 22, 6 - 10pm Reception

URI-EICHEN Gallery 2101 South Halsted CHICAGO Illinois 60608


On display in the gallery for one night only: Original drawings from Lena Finkle’s Magic Barrel
8pm reading and signing

Anya Ulinich presents Lena Finkle's MagicBarrel, a graphic novel about dating, love, sex, immigration, motherhood, literature, and the meaning of life."Lena Finkle's Magic Barrel has no antecedents, that it transcends its influences so thoroughly it creates a form, a language, all its own." - The Los Angeles Times

"An honest and absorbing tragicomedy about love, sex, and everything that goes with them." - Publishers Weekly

“Funny, painful, outrageous . . . Anya Ulinich is the David Sedaris of Russian-American cartoonists.” - Gary Shteyngart, author of Super Sad True Love Story and Little Failure

Anya Ulinich grew up in Moscow, Russia, and immigrated to Arizona when she was seventeen. She holds a BFA from SAIC and an MFA in visual arts from the University of California, Davis. Her first novel, Petropolis (Viking, 2007) was translated into ten languages and named Best Book of 2007 by the Village Voice and the Christian Science Monitor. Ulinich was awarded the Goldberg Prize for Emerging Writers of Jewish Fiction and the National Book Foundation's "5 under 35" prize. Her graphic novel, Lena Finkle’s Magic Barrel, is available at the end of July. Ulinich’s short stories and essays have appeared in The New York Times, Zoetrope: All-Story, n+1, and PEN America Journal. She teaches writing at the New School and has taught at NYU and Gotham Writer’s Workshop. She lives in Brooklyn with her two daughters.

Web: www.anyaulinichbooks.com

Twitter: @AnyaUlinich


A Different Way: Brazil

Opening: August 8 6pm-10pm

A Different Way: Brazil by appointment only through September 5.

Opening is free and open to the public.
Appointments: if you cannot come to the opening events, please call 312 852-7717 for an appointment.

URI-EICHEN Gallery - 2101 South Halsted - CHICAGO Illinois 60608

Aliene de Souza Howell paintings of workers from the MST (Landless Rural Workers’ Movement), posters, and textiles from the MST and Solidarity Economy Cooperatives.

8pm Discussion with Ruth Needleman and Jeff Frank: Lowering income inequality and growing social movements
 
Discussion:

Jeff Frank, a National Lawyers Guild attorney, has been involved with the Brazilian Landless Workers Movement (MST) for over 10 years. Since 2009, Jeff has been the national coordinator for the Friends of the MST (www.mstbrazil.org), the US based support group for the MST. In that capacity, Jeff has coordinated the visits of MST militants to the US and facilitated US activists in connecting with the MST in Brazil. Most recently, Jeff helped lead a delegation of Friends of the MST members and US activists to the MST's 6th Congress in order to strengthen international solidarity.

Ruth Needleman is forever learning from Brazil. She has brought delegations of workers there to study social movements; has taught graduate courses twice in Fortaleza, and has studied popular education and the solidarity economy. This past January she spent three weeks in Canoas where the Workers’ Party is building a new system of democracy that is engaging thousands of people in self-government. Confused about recent protests? She can help you understand! Ruth is professor emerita from Indiana University Labor Studies and a lifetime activist.



JULY 2014

Dimitris Michalakis and Marina Miliou-Theocharaki: Austerity and Greece

July 11: Opening 6pm-10pm
Austerity and Greece by appointment only through August 1. For an appointment call 312 852 7717
URI-EICHEN Gallery
2101 South Halsted
CHICAGO Illinois 60608

Dimitris Michalakis' photographs interpret the chaos of life in austerity at home. Since 2009 Greece has faced the consequences of a severe economic crisis. Consecutive austerity packages, following

Greece’s bail-out agreement with the EU and the IMF have been tearing apart the social fabric, placing extreme pressure upon the middle class and spreading misery across society. Dimitris Michalakis was born in 1977 in Elefsina, Greece. He studied photography at the Focus School of Photography in Athens. Since 2004 he has been a regular contributor to K Magazine, (Kathimerini Sunday edition), and the E Magazine (Eleytherotypia Sunday edition). His photographs have been published in various Greek and international publications (Spiegel, Die Zeit, Rolling Stones Magazine). He has traveled on journalistic missions to more than 30 countries, mainly in ex Soviet Countries.

Marina Miliou-Theocharaki was born in Athens, Greece and lives and works in Chicago. She is currently completing the final year of a dual Bachelors degree in Fine Arts and Visual and Critical Studies at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago. She is currently investigating the radical changes taking place in the Eurozone economy, and in particular their jarring consequences for the Greek populace. With emphasis on the dynamic relation between immigrants and a recent surge in Neo---Nazi activity, she creates experiential narratives. http://marinamiliou---theo.com/home.html

July 11- Special Event: 8pm Discussion: Global Failures of Austerity
Discussion: The global failures of austerity with Mel Rothenberg and on local austerity issues with Kari Lydersen



Bios for the presenters on panel:

Kari Lydersen is a Chicago-based reporter, author and journalism instructor specializing in energy, the environment, labor and immigration issues. She is the author of Mayor 1%: Rahm Emanuel and the Rise of Chicago’s 99%, and four other books, including a just-released chronicle about the struggle to close Chicago’s coal power plants. She is community fellowship director of the Social Justice News Nexus program at the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University, and she also works as a research associate for the Medill Watchdog Project.

Mel Rothenberg: a year after his arrival at the University of Chicago as a mathematics instructor in the fall of 1961 he became active in Chicago SNCC, which was to become the leading radical civil rights organization in the city for a number of years. He was to remain on the mathematics faculty of the University of Chicago until his retirement in 1999. His theoretical interests and writings have focused on the lessons of the Soviet period, and what they mean for the transition to socialism, and in particular what the fundamental strategic issues are that confront the construction of a mass, working class movement for Socialism in the advanced industrial world. Since his retirement as an active research mathematician, he has focused on the study of Political Economy. He is a founding member of the Chicago Political Economy Group, which has done economic policy analysis particularly in the area of job creation.


JUNE 2014

Trans Pacific Partnership and NAFTA at 20: Activist Art and Panel Discussion


OPENING:June 13, 6pm-10pm

URI-EICHEN Gallery - 2101 S Halsted
Chicago IL 60608

Hand-painted banners from Maine's Artists' Rapid Response Team, additional prints from ASARO in Oaxaca about NAFTA and Fair Trade, Lester Dore woodcuts and Steve Blank's Democracy Shred!

ARRT! – The Artists Rapid Response Team -- creates banners and props to promote the work of progressive non-profits across the state of Maine. ARRT! is a project of the UMVA (Union of Maine Visual Artists) and all members of UMVA are invited to join. ARRT! has been active for more than a year, creating over seventy issue-oriented banners and props

By appointment through July 5. For an appointment call 312 852 7717

Discussion- 8pm on June 13th - Fair Trade Now! Lee Sustar and Ron Baiman on NAFTA and TPP, Carson Starkey of Illinois Fair Trade Coalition,

URI-EICHEN.com

Bios for the presenters on panel:

Ron Baiman has taught at the University of Chicago, DePaul University, University of Illinois at Chicago, and Roosevelt University. He worked in public policy as Director of Budget and Policy Analysis at the Center for Tax and Budget Accountability in Chicago; in government as a Research Economist for the Illinois Department of Employment Security; in academic research institutes at Loyola University's Center for Urban Research and Learning, the Institute of Government and Public Affairs of the University of Illinois, and the Center for Urban Economic Development at University of Illinois at Chicago. He holds a Ph.D., and an M.A. with Honors, both in Economics from the New School for Social Research in New York City.

Carson Starkey, Field Director for the Illinois Fair Trade Coalition, got his start knocking on doors for Paul Welstone. IFTC Presentations aim to provide understandable facts about trade and economic policy that will empower ordinary citizens as they seek to influence the political process.The Illinois Fair Trade Coalition unites organizations who believe that trade policy and globalization should benefit working people and public health and local communities in Illinois and around the world.

Lee Sustar is labor editor for Socialist Worker/SocialistWorker.org. His writings on economics and international affairs have appeared in the International Socialist Review, New Labor Forum, New Politics, Znet,and other publications.

URI-EICHEN.com

MAY-SEPTEMBER 2014 Global Human Rights and Economic Justice Series

Special Event MAY 28th, 2014
7pm-9pm

URI-EICHEN Gallery
2101 S Halsted - Chicago IL

Beehive Collective Workshop: Resistance to Neo-Colonialism

Over eight years in the making, the Mesoamerica Resiste! graphic is a collaboratively-made, highly-detailed, allegorical illustration brought to life by the Bees themselves: volunteer activists, storytellers, and educators who use hand-drawn cartoons and stories from grassroots communities to explore the connections between our local, everyday stories and the bigger picture of our historical moment. Project Mesoamerica (formerly “Plan Puebla Panama”), a development project of unprecedented scale, aims to colonize and transform the land from Mexico to Colombia in the interest of building infrastructure to facilitate resource extraction and create more “efficient” global trade routes... just as early European monarchies set out to do more than 500 years ago.

Plan Mesoamerica would cause devastating habitat loss for migratory species whose ranges span from the Arctic to the Antarctic, displace Indigenous Peoples from their lands, and accelerate urbanization, poverty, and cultural homogenization.  But there is good news too - we highlight the countless stories of inspiring, courageous and creative resistance throughout the region!

Told in plainspoken and accessible language, the Bees' engaging narrative combines clearheaded analysis with the heartfelt imperative to organize, support, and engage these often overwhelming issues... together!

With huge "portable murals" and a slideshow that zooms in on all the dizzying details, the Bees' mission is to "cross-pollinate the grassroots," drawing audiences together around common experiences and hopeful possibilities for collective action.

The Beehive Design Collective is a wildly motivated, all-volunteer, activist arts collective dedicated to "cross-pollinating the grassroots" by creating collaborative, anti-copyright images for use as educational and organizing tools. We work as word-to-image translators of complex global stories, shared with us through conversations with affected communities.

"The work of the Beehive Collective goes far beyond the traditional understanding of solidarity. It is actively fostering equal exchanges and relationship building between communities that are involved in the same struggle for justice and democracy throughout the Western Hemisphere. Their open and inclusive process and the incorporation of Latin American mythology into their work transcends borders and language barriers. The Beehive collective breaks away from traditional forms of education…The Beehive collective are pioneers and their work is telling and effective"

- Hendrik Voss, School of the Americas Watch, Washington D.C.


Special Event: MAY 17th 2014, 2pm

GRASSROOTS UNIONISM and RANK-AND-FILE DEMOCRACY
a fundraiser for the Teamster Rank-and-File Education and Legal Defense Foundation

Saturday May 17, 2:00 p.m.

URI-EICHEN Gallery
2101 S Halsted Chicago IL 606008

What are labor activists doing to resist the corporate war on working communities and revive the labor movement?

Join special guest Ken Paff and other labor and union reform activists for a discussion on the latest developments inside the Teamsters and the new organizing we need to rebuild our power.

The Teamster Rank-and-File Education and Legal Defense Foundation (TRF) is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization.

Your donations to TRF are tax-deductible.

GUEST SPEAKER:
Ken Paff is the national organizer for Teamsters for a Democratic Union, the largest and longest-running grassroots labor reform movement in the U.S.

May 9 2014

ASARO: Assembly of Revolutionary Artists of Oaxaca: Seven Years- Prints from the Movement and the Story of the Revolution
Opening Reception: May 9, 6-10pm URI-EICHEN Gallery2101 S Halsted
By appointment through June 6. For an appointment call 312 852 7717

The Asamblea de Artistas Revolucionarios de Oaxaca (Assembly of Revolutionary Artists of Oaxaca or ASARO) grew out of the 2006 Oaxaca teachers' strike and the violence that followed. ASARO formed as a collective, no individual artist's names are used, working in a variety of mediums to commemorate public actions and critique political responses.

From ASARO: We seek to initiate an artistic movement where the final goal is direct contact with people in the streets and in public spaces. We believe that public art (in all its diverse artistic disciplines) is a form of communication that allows a dialogue with all sectors of society and which makes possible the visualization of the real conditions of existence-the norms and contradictions of the society which we all inhabit.

Check out the collection of work - selected by ASARO and not seen in Chicago before, with pieces from the 7 years of work of the collective.

PROGRAM: 8pm - the Political Conditions in Oaxaxa that led the formation of ASARO, the Practices of the ASARO Collective with Lester Dore and Pancho McFarland.

Pancho McFarland is associate professor sociology at CSU, in the fields of race, gender and culture. In 1999 he received his PhD in sociology from the University of Texas at Austin where he studied the Zapatista uprising in Chiapas, Mexico. His current work examines Chicana/o rap music and Chicana/o and Latina/o cultures. His writings on Chicana/o culture have appeared in Aztlán, Callaloo, Race, Gender and Class, Meridians and Bad Subjects as well as in several books and encyclopedias. His book, Chicano Rap: Gender and Violence in the Postindustrial Barrio was published by the University of Texas Pressin 2008. His second book, New Millenial Mestizaje: Hip Hop an Chicano Identity, is approaching completion. In addition to his scholarly work, Dr. McFarland is active in the food and environmental justice movements.

Lester Dore was part of the early Chicago Surrealist movement, a designer and illustrator for the Chicago Seed, In These Times, The Progressive, Salsedo Press, The Ocooch Mountain News, Heartland Journal and the Heartland Cafe, and a founder of Art Surge Madison. He has devoted much of his output over the last 40 years to peace and justice issues but also finds deep .satisfaction in observation of the natural world. Lester has spent time working in Mexico with the artists in ASARO and will speak about his experiences there.

Live Music with Kara Jackson 9pm

MAY-SEPTEMBER 2014 Global Human Rights and Economic Justice Series

June 13: Trans Pacific Partnership and NAFTA at 20 featuring work of ASARO and Artists' Rapid Response Team and more! Program: Fair Trade Now!

July 11: Austerity and Greece. Group show of Greek artists interpreting the chaos of life after austerity at home. Discussion: The global failures of austerity. Local discussion about austerity issues with Kari Lydersen.

August 8: A Different Way: Brazil: lowering income inequality and social movements: group show and discussion focused on Brazil's Landless Worker's Movement

September 12: BOYCOTT! The Art of Economic Activism from American Friends Service Committee and the Center for the Study of Political Graphics, LA


MAY 2 2014

Joe Hill 100 Years Part 2 Bucky Halker plays Joe Hill’s Music - Featuring a discussion of the Warehouse Workers United organizing campaign and reception for woodcut prints of John Pitman Weber "Fences and Migrants"
May 2, 7pm-10pm
URI-EICHEN Gallery
2101 S Halsted
Chicago

BUCKY HALKER BUCKY HALKER, Ph.D., is a singer-songwriter, performer, and scholar with a dozen recordings to his credit, including Welcome to Labor Land, a recording of Illinois labor songs from the past, and the all-originalsWisconsin 2-13-63, vols. 1 & 2. His new double-CD release, The Ghost of Woody Guthrie (2012), offers an original music tribute to Woody Guthrie.

Bucky is also the author of For Democracy, Workers, and God: Labor Song-Poems and Labor Protest, 1865-1895 and is the producer-scholar for the Folksongs of Illinois CD series. Bucky serves on the board of the Woody Guthrie Foundation and Archives and is the Director of Company of Folk, an organization devoted to documenting and presenting the rich traditions of folk and ethnic music and art in the Midwest. Bucky was awarded the Archie Green Fellowship with American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress in 2011-2012.

About the visual art: Migrant labor is a worldwide phenomenon, from the Persian Gulf to the EU and the USA. Migrant labor is essential to the functioning of neo-liberal, globalized capital, -and not only in seasonal work (lawn care, roofing). Migrants are commonly without rights, super-exploited, subject to wage theft, arbitrary imprisonment and deportation, physical and sexual abuse, even where they are under "contract."

Razor and barbed wire fencing have become ubiquitous in our society. First produced commercially here in Illinois (Dekalb,) wire entanglements were as basic to the "conquest" (expropriation) of "The West" as they were to trench warfare. Today, wire entanglements are everywhere, keeping people out, or our 2 million plus prisoners in it.




May 1 2014

Illinois Labor HIstory Society Annual Meeting

(following the May Day activities)

The Uri-Eichen Gallery - 5:30 PM Light Buffet & 6:00 PM Meeting The Gallery is located at 2101 S. Halsted in Chicago. 

Special Presentation by Christian Pilichowski,

International Representative of the French CGT

The Global Fight Against Austerity & the Rebirth of the

Word Labor Movement


APRIL 28 2014

Support Bangladeshi Garment Workers!
A Call To Action!
WORKERS MEMORIAL DAY!
One year ago 1,100 garment workers died in the Rana Plaza factory collapse in Bangladesh. Chicago area labor, student, and social justice groups and their allies have intensified their efforts since then to support the fight for safe and just working conditions for Bangladeshi garment workers and for garment industry supply chain workers in the US. Where do we go from here? How can we make our work even more effective? Let’s grow this movement together! Bring your ideas and join us!

When: Monday, April 28, 2014

Time: 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM

Where: Uri-Eichen Gallery
2101 S. Halsted
Chicago, Illinois

Sponsors (in formation)

Chicago Workers Collaborative
IFT-AFT Local 6297
Food Chain Workers Alliance
ROC United
United Electrical Workers (UE)
United Students Against Sweatshops
UIC School of Public Health EOHS
Warehouse Workers for Justice

Questions? trinatocco@gmail.com (269) 873-1000

APRIL 11 2014

John Pitman Weber Fences and Migrants: woodcut prints

Opening- Friday, April 11
6 pm to 10pm

URI-EICHEN Gallery
2101 S Halsted
Chicago

Migrant labor is a worldwide phenomenon, from the Persian Gulf to the EU and the USA. Migrant labor is essential to the functioning of neo-liberal, globalized capital, -and not only in seasonal work (lawn care, roofing). Migrants are commonly without rights, super-exploited, subject to wage theft, arbitrary imprisonment and deportation, physical and sexual abuse, even where they are under "contract."
John Pitman Weber, Fences and Migrants: woodcut prints

Razor and barbed wire fencing have become ubiquitous in our society. First produced commercially here in Illinois (Dekalb,) wire entanglements were as basic to the "conquest" (expropriation) of "The West" as they were to trench warfare. Today, wire entanglements are everywhere, keeping people out, or our 2 million plus prisoners in it.

John Pitman Weber - Best known as a public artist, John Pitman Weber has led and co-led mosaic, concrete relief, and painted murals for over 40 years, in Chicago, New York City, Los Angeles, Minneapolis, England, France, Nicaragua, and Spain. He has led many workshops and lectured in Mexico, France, Britain, and Belgium.

John Pitman Weber, Fences and Migrants: woodcut prints Weber has participated in major international and national travelling shows, including the Museum of Modern Art’s “Committed to Print,” the Jewish Museum’s “Bridges and Boundries,” “Kunst und Krieg” 1989, Berlin, the recent “Poetic Dialogue Project,” and “Windows and Mirrors,” from the AFSC, travelling nationally. He is represented in the collections of the Art Institute of Chicago, the Spertus Museum, the DePaul University Museum, the Brauer Museum of Valparaiso U., the Cohen Library of City College, CCNY, the Koehnline Museum of Oakton College and t Elmhurst College, Illinois Benedictine, Loyola and the Illiinois Labor History Society. He has had over 30 solo shows, including five in New York City. Most recently he exhibited at the Zhou B Art Center in Bridgeport. Weber co-founded the Chicago Mural Group (now Chicago Public Art Group) with the late William Walker in 1970-71. He authored, with Eva and James Cockcroft Toward A People’s Art (Dutton, 1977), the classic account of the early years of the contemporary mural movement, reissued in 1998 in an expanded edition by U. of New Mexico Press.

Weber studied at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, L’Ecole Nationale Superieure des Beaux Arts, Paris, and Harvard University. He learned printmaking with S.W. Hayter at Atelier 17, Paris. He has done woodcut and lino cut prints since childhood. Weber taught at Elmhurst College for 43 years and is now Emeritus. His studio-home is in Chicago’s Pilsen neighborhood. He has exhibited in Pilsen since the 1980’s. He has four sons

John Pitman Weber: By appointment through 5-3-14. For an appointment, call 312 852 7717

MARCH 2014

3rd Anniversary of the Occupation: Inside at Night
The complete collection: Madison Wisconsin-Occupation of the Capitol

Join us Friday the 14th for an amazing show about hundreds of courageous citizens, fighting for democracy in Wisconsin. At 7:30 pm join us for a discussion about how the attack on labor is now nation-wide in Harris v. Quinn, a Supreme Court case that originates in Illinois and could take Walker's plan from Wisconsin national. Please join us for this very important show and discussion on opening night. To top off the evening Chicago's troubadour Mark Dvorak will play for attendees!

Opening Reception
March 14 6pm-10pm

URI-EICHEN Gallery
2101 South Halsted
CHICAGO Illinois 60608

Inside at Night - Origins of an Uprising was a collaborative effort of nine photographers - both professional and not - who were actively shooting inside the Capitol Rotunda during the occupation. It is a collection of 160 photos curated by John Riggs of Tamarack Gallery in Madison, Wisconsin. 

Inside at Night tells the story of the few hundred who held the Capitol against all efforts to remove them while the Senators stayed in Illinois.  Without the heroic sacrifice (many were neglecting jobs, school, family, their own needs) of those inside to a higher purpose, none of the rest could have happened. In the face of intimidation, harassment, lies by the press and administration, and finally a condition of siege (the nights got colder, the lights brighter, the police scanners louder, the granite and marble floors harder, the air smellier, the food staler and scarcer, support more difficult to access, and replacements impossible because the doors were all barricaded against entry), a few hundred citizens held the Capitol. As long as they stayed inside, the Senators stayed away (preventing a vote on the seditious Act 10), and the crowds continued marching outside in solidarity.

Featured Photgraphers:
Matthew Apps
Douglas Bosley
Nataraj Hauser
Katie Jesse
Tom McInvaille  
Brent Nicastro
Leslie Peterson
John Riggs
Don Sylvester

Discussion 7:30pm Harris v. Quinn: the Attack on Labor Goes National -  Panel with Thomas H. Geoghegan, Mike Newman, and moderated by In These Times David Moberg 

Thomas H. Geoghegan is a Chicago lawyer and author.  He is the president of the law firm of Despres, Schwartz and Geoghegan, Ltd.  The firm has won many victories for unions and employee groups in the federal courts, brings suits to enforce the minimum wage laws, recover pension and health benefits for displaced workers in connection with plant closings, public-interest lawsuits to restrict the sale of handguns, to enforce child labor laws and to require public health measures for the homeless.

Recently, Mr. Geoghegan and his colleagues represented parents trying to block the closing of 49 public schools in Chicago. He and his colleagues are currently representing taxi drivers trying to enforce their rights to receive the federal and state minimum wage from the City of Chicago.  The firm is also currently in an appeal of a challenge to the gerrymandering of the 50 wards by the Chicago City Council.  

Mike Newman is Associate Director of Council 31, American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees, which represents 70,000 public employees in Illinois.  He has also served as Council 31's Assistant Director and Legislative Director, as an organizer for both AFSCME and the International Ladies' Garment Workers Union, and as a Labor Educator.  Among his current duties, he oversees the negotiation and contract administration of over 200 collective bargaining agreements between AFSCME and various employers in Illinois.  He is the chief administrator for the union’s contract with the State of Illinois, and is the union’s chief negotiator with the City of Chicago and Cook County

Musical Guest: Mark Dvorak and Kara Jackson  

By appointment through 4-5-14. For an appointment, call 312 852 7717

FEBRUARY 2014


Ladydrawers: Our Fashion Year and Other Projects

FEBRUARY 14, 6pm to 10pm
URI-EICHEN Gallery, 2101 S Halsted 312 852 7717

The Ladydrawers Comics Collective (AKA “The Ladydrawers”) is an unofficially affiliated group of women, men, transgender, and non-binary gender folk who research, perform, and publish comics and texts about how economics, race, sexuality, and gender impact the comics industry, other media, and our culture at large.
 
Exhibiting artists include Sarah Jaffe (New York), Delia Jean (Chicago), Julia Gfrörer (Portland), Melissa Mendes (Brooklyn), Fran Syass (Chicago), Lindsey Smith (Chicago) and Anne Elizabeth Moore (Chicago)

Our Fashion Year is a year-long, in-depth series of monthly comic reports on gender and labor concerns throughout the international garment and sex trades.

8 pm :Get a peek at the Ladydrawers upcoming documentary, "Comics Undressed." Fran Syass will exhibit brief interviews from an assortment of people involved in comics. These interviews will reveal current outlooks, beliefs, and problems that affect comics culture and at society at large.

The exhibition will be the first print appearance of Gfrörer and Mendes’ collaborations with Anne

Elizabeth Moore on the series—in gorgeous, humungous giclée prints—as well as strips by Sarah Jaffe and Delia Jean.

Valentine’s Day treats at the opening from Ladydrawers and URI-EICHEN

Musical Guest: Kara Jackson

FEBRUARY 14, 6pm to 10pm
URI-EICHEN Gallery, 2101 S Halsted
Open by appointment through March 7. For an appointment call 312 852 7717

JANUARY 2014

SAVE THE DATE!

Join URI-EICHEN Gallery for a night of music, art, and discussion featuring Jon Langford

Joe Hill 100 Years, Part 1 of a series at URI-EICHEN Gallery celebrating Joe Hill's life, songs, art and the Industrial Workers of the World


Joe Hill Part 1: JANUARY 10, 7pm to 10pm

URI-EICHEN Gallery, 2101 S Halsted 312 852 7717

Special Musical Guest Jon Langford and Pocket Guide to Hell's Paul Durica leads historical reenactment Chicago Responds to Joe Hill's Arrest

Imagery provided with assistance of Joseph A. Labadie Collection, University of Michigan Library and Walter P Reuther Library, Wayne State University

Who was Joe Hill? What happened in January of 1914 in Salt Lake City, Utah that would soon have workers around the world demanding justice? Join us for a night of music and art in the first part of the series that will span 23 months, the last months of Hill’s life.

Special Guest: Jon Langford

"The great rock and roll bridge between punk's back alleys and country music's windswept plains." - Portland Mercury

"Jon Langford has grit in his voice and melody in his soul. A punk-rock pioneer, a leading light of alt-country, a troubadour for our times, a musicians’ mentor, a visual artist of uncommon skill, a singer-songwriter who writes with the authority of having lived a life rather just having imagined it, how do you peg Langford?

Is he folk, rock, country, punk, what? Yes, he’s all that. Langford is Langford, a transplanted Welshman who’s been in Chicago long enough for us to claim him, and in doing so, stake a claim to a treasure.
" - Chicago New City

2013 EVENTS

DECEMBER 2013

2nd Annual Human Rights Day Show

Mike Konopacki's fromHoward Zinn's People's History of American EmpireOpening Reception: December 6, 6-10pm

URI-EICHEN Gallery, 2101 S Halsted, Chicago 312 852 7717

Discussion: 730pm, American Imperialism with Ruth Needleman and Joe Isobaker
Live music: 9pm with Kara Jackson and Zelda Zerkel

Mike Konopacki: graduated from the University of Wisconsin in 1974 with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Political Science. He began labor cartooning for the Madison Press Connection, a local daily created by striking newspaper workers in 1978. In 1983 he and Gary Huck created Huck/Konopacki Labor Cartoons, syndicating their cartoons to the labor press in the U.S. and Canada. Since that time they have published six collections of labor cartoons, Bye! American, THEM, MAD in USA, Working Class Hero, Two Headed Space Alien Shrinks Labor Movement and the latest American Dread. With Alec Dubro Mike has written and drawn comic books and comics on the World Bank, welfare reform and union organizing. Mike is co-author and illustrator of Howard Zinn's graphic history A People's History of American Empire. In May of 2009 Mike earned his Master of Arts from the University of Wisconsin - Madison Art Department. In 2010, Mike completed his Master of Fine Arts from the UW-Madison.

Discussion: 730pm- American Imperialism

Joe Iosbaker is an anti-war activist and a rank and file leader in SEIU Local 73. His home was raided by the FBI in 2010. He is part of the leadership of the United National Antiwar Coalition, and served as a national coordinator for the march on the NATO Summit in Chicago in May 2012. Joe will be speaking about American Imperialism in the Middle East.

Ruth Needleman: Just back from Honduras, Ruth is a professor emeritus from Labor Studies, Indiana University. Still teaching and practicing activism, she is the author of Black Freedom Fighters in Steel, and many articles examining today's labor unions. She set up the Latin American Studies program at UC Santa Cruz, she worked with Cesar Chavez in California. lived in Chile under Allende, lived in Brazil and taught graduate classes in Northern Brazil, she has traveled extensively in Cuba, she helped develop a film and booklet on Mexican Cananea Situation, she was on a Witness for Peace trip to Colombia in 2012. Ruth will be speaking about American Imperialism in Central and South America.

By appointment through December 24. For an appointment call 312 852 7717

NOVEMBER 2013

URI-EICHEN Gallery 2101 S Halsted Presents:

Marjorie Kovler Center: Torture Survivor Stories

November 8, 6-10pm Opening Reception

Heartland Alliance Marjorie Kovler Center is a local torture treatment center providing holistic care and support services to a group of Chicago area residents not often recognized or heard from. They represent all regions of the world, all vocations and professions, all genders and have in common experiences of deplorable and unimaginable abuses of political power we all hope never to encounter.

The exhibit combines collective and individual photography projects with a range of subjects, including quilts of woven portraits and photographs conveying aspects of the impact of torture, past and present.

Live Drumming with Mamadou Fantastic Kama 730pm

Panel discussion with the artists and staff from the center 8pm

About one of the artists: Irene Martinez is a MD, a wellness activist, human rights advocate, visual artist and creative writer based in Chicago. In the 1970s, she was a political prisoner-a desaparecida-in Argentina and an Amnesty International prisoner of conscience. She has practiced medicine at Cook County (Stroger) Hospital for three decades and is a founding member of the Marjorie Kovler Center for the Treatment of Torture Survivors. Her collaborative photographic work (with photographers Monte Kreus and Gabriel Ontiveros) visually narrates the personal, familial and political experience of the "dirty wars" in Argentina as a way of working through these traumatic events both personally and publicly

- by appointment through December 1. For an Appointment call 312 852 7717

OCTOBER 2013

Torture and Isolation in the CPD Chicago Artist Month and Pilsen Open Studios
Mono print collages of roll leaf foil. Prints are collaborations by Kathy Steichen and Christopher Urias, co-owners of URI-EICHEN Gallery. We are very excited to work with Lucky Pierre Sunday, October 20th- Join us!

- October 11, 6-10 pm opening reception

- October 19, 12-8pm open gallery, printing demonstrations, roll leaf foil

- October 20, 12-6pm open gallery, printing demonstrations, roll leaf foil


SPACE LIMITED- FREE PERFORMANCE WORKSHOP WITH LUCKY PIERRE!
October 20 1-3pm: 100 Actions for Chicago Torture Justice rsvp gabbyfish@hotmail.com by 10-18-2013

URI-EICHEN Gallery 2101 S Halsted - el Halsted Orange Line stop, cta bus at gallery door

By appointment through November 1. Call (312) 852-7717 for appointment

SEPTEMBER 2013

One Year Anniversary of the Strike!

The final show in the 8 Hours for Work, 8 Hours for Rest, 8 Hoursfor What We Will series of art shows about worker rights

 

Chicago Teachers Union: Rank and File CTU member photos, art, strike posters, member testimonials.

100s of members and supporters images on display!

URI-EICHEN Gallery | 2101 S Halsted El- Halsted

By appointment through October 3. For an appointment call 312 852 7717

Co-sponsored by the Illinois Labor History Society

AUGUST 2013

Moving Mountains: People of Faith and the Struggle for Justice for Workers,Interfaith Worker Justice

The fourth show in the series
Eight Hours for Work, Eight Hours for Rest, Eight Hours for What We Will
Friday, August 9 - 6-10:pm

Open by appointment through August 30th
For an appointment call (312) 852-7717


Panel Discussion 8pm

Live Music

Faith communities and the labor movement have long been allies in the fight for worker justice, from the historic Catholic Labor Guild network and the Jewish Lyceum, Cesar Chavez's Farmworkers' Movement and Martin Luther King's support for sanitation workers.

On August 9th Interfaith Worker Justice and the URI-EICHEN Gallery invite you to take a look at the important role people of faith play in supporting campaigns and programs that impact the lives of low-wage workers and their families.

Featuring documentary photography from local and national campaigns, worker leaders in campaigns, music, and discussion.

 

JULY 2013


A Series of Photos by Milton Rogovin: Steelworkers and Miners, Film, Steelworker Stories: Steelworker Oral Histories from Michael Frisch, Discussion with Mark Rogovin,
Live Music: Mark Dvorak - July 12, 6-10:pm Friday, 12th July 2013
A Series of Photos by Milton Rogovin: Steelworkers and Miners, Film, Steelworker Stories: Steelworker Oral Histories from Michael Frisch, Discussion with Mark Rogovin, A Series of Photos by Milton Rogovin: Steelworkers and Miners, Film, Steelworker Stories: Steelworker Oral Histories from Michael Frisch, Discussion with Mark Rogovin, A Series of Photos by Milton Rogovin: Steelworkers and Miners, Film, Steelworker Stories: Steelworker Oral Histories from Michael Frisch, Discussion with Mark Rogovin,

Film:  Picture Man:The Poetry of Photographer Milton Rogovin. Milton Rogovin wrote poems about some of his most meaningful images – some poems were funny and others wereserious. These photo/poems were woven into this 20 minute film
Post film discussion with Mark Rogovin

Mark Rogovin was an assistantto Mexican muralist David Alfaro Siqueiros on his last mural, the March of Humanity. He received an MFA degree from the Art Institute of Chicago andgraduated in 1970. He founded the Public Art Workshop, a mural center in the Austin community. Among other projects he co-authored Mural Manual, the onlystep-by-step guide to producing murals for classrooms and street corners.

In 1981 he co-founded the Peace Museum. In 1997 he directed a nationwide organization to celebrate thecentennial of singer and activist Paul Robeson. Mark now heads the Rogovin Collection with a mission to promote the educational use of the socialdocumentary photography of his father, Milton Rogovin. In 2011 he directed and produced Be Filled With the Spirit,a film on the Storefront series of Milton's photographs

Portraits in Steel Photo-Oral History Video

Michael Frisch

Many of Milton Rogovin’s subjects in the 1970s Working People Series were Buffalo NY steelworkers. By the late 1980s,all were ex-steelworkers: every Buffalo mill, foundry, and shop in which Rogovin had photographed had closed. Thisled Rogovin to a unique project: he invited oral historian Michael Frisch to conduct life history interviews with WorkingPeople photo subjects, and Rogovin took new portraits of each worker. The resulting book and travelling exhibit(Portraits in Steel , Cornell University Press, 1993) presented Buffalo steelworkers in their own words and imagesbefore and after the onslaught of plant closings and deindustrialization.

Recently, new technical capacities have led Frisch to revisit the project, working directly now with the interview audiorecordings rather than transcription texts. He is combining the photographic portraits with selected audio passages in thephoto subjects’ voices—a combination surprisingly rare in documentary photography.

The URI-EICHEN Gallery complements the exhibit of Rogovin’s photographs with a video sample of this new work-in-progress.Frisch and Mark Rogovin, Milton’s son, hope this may grow into a full multimedia exhibit and/or a comprehensive digitalversion of Portraits in Steel combining worker voices and photographic portraits.

A Series of Photos by Milton Rogovin: Steelworkers and Miners, Film, Steelworker Stories: Steelworker Oral Histories from Michael Frisch, Discussion with Mark Rogovin, A Series of Photos by Milton Rogovin: Steelworkers and Miners, Film, Steelworker Stories: Steelworker Oral Histories from Michael Frisch, Discussion with Mark Rogovin A Series of Photos by Milton Rogovin: Steelworkers and Miners, Film, Steelworker Stories: Steelworker Oral Histories from Michael Frisch, Discussion with Mark Rogovin A Series of Photos by Milton Rogovin: Steelworkers and Miners, Film, Steelworker Stories: Steelworker Oral Histories from Michael Frisch, Discussion with Mark Rogovin A Series of Photos by Milton Rogovin: Steelworkers and Miners, Film, Steelworker Stories: Steelworker Oral Histories from Michael Frisch, Discussion with Mark Rogovin A Series of Photos by Milton Rogovin: Steelworkers and Miners, Film, Steelworker Stories: Steelworker Oral Histories from Michael Frisch, Discussion with Mark Rogovin

JUNE 14 2013

Battles in the Capitols: the Fight for a Union - Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, and Wisconsin Friday, 14th June 2013 from 6:00 – 11:30pm

June 14, 6pm-11:30pm (Show open by appointment only through June 31)
The second show in the series Eight Hours for Work, Eight Hours for Rest, Eight Hours for What We Will: A series of art shows, events and music - about work.

Roundtable Discussion 730pm: panel from the states: moderated by Illinois Labor History Society President Larry Spivack with Harriet Rowan, investigative journalist, Arthur Kohl Riggs Wisconsin Activist, Candidate for Governor, George Macaluso, Laborer from Michigan, and Indiana University Professor Ruth Needleman.

Live Music The Brothers StarRace, consists of two members Richard Juarez and Raul Juarez. The brothers have casually played music together for years. Inspired by many artists, the Brothers StarRace play and write music reflecting their lives growing up in Chicago‘s Mexican American community of Little Village and the struggles of youth

Film 10pm : WE ARE WISCONSIN is a feature length documentary film that follows the day-to-day unfolding of public outcry against Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker’s controversial budget-repair bill, focusing on the human story behind a remarkable popular uprising forged on the floor of the Madison Capitol. Director, Amie Williams, Executive Producer, Doug Pray

Featuring nearly 40 artists, poets, activists, story tellers and musicians. Panel Discussion 730-9pm. Live Music, 9-10 pm. Film We Are Wisconsin 10-11:30pm.

Presented by URI-EICHEN Gallery, 2101 S Halsted, Chicago


Photo by Katie Jesse

Photo by Katie Jesse


JUNE 8 2013

Join us on Saturday June 8th 2013 to celebrate the life of Rudy Lozano.URI-EICHEN Gallery
2101 S Halsted
7-11pm

"El Hijo del Pueblo" The Son of the Village

Rudy Lozano was a community and labor organizer in the Pilsen/Little Village area. He worked throughout Chicago to join African American, Mexican, and Puerto Rican communities together to successfully elect the first African American Mayor of Chicago, Harold Washington. Rudy Lozano was taken away from his people at the young age of 31.

The Lozano family will speak on Rudy's legacy and the organization that began in his memory - Centro Sin Fronteras.

More than a dozen artists from the community will participate in an art show and auction, spoken word by Michael Reyes , Poetry, and Live Performance by Rosalba Valdez "La Voz de Los Imigrantes"

Commemorating Rudy and speaking about his legacy will be

Rudy Lozano Jr., Emma Lozano , Jesus "Chuy" Garcia, Rev. Walter Slim Coleman

All Donations and proceeds will go to a campaign to support the Children of the Migrants, to stop the deportations, and the fight for the human rights of immigrants at Centro Sin Fronteras

https://www.facebook.com/events/363534277080004/ 
refreshments served

Panelist Discussion: The Battles in the Capitols: Why this Attack on Labor and How to Fight Back! 730-9pm Friday, 14th June 2013

Harriet Rowan founded the Information Station during the occupation of the Wisconsin State Capitol, which served as a hub for information and coordination for the 17 days that people slept inside the Capitol. She has remained involved as an activist, and works as an investigative journalist, researching issues like the influence ALEC has on Wisconsin and national politics.

Arthur Kohl-Riggs is a Wisconsin activist, organizer and citizen journalist. After spending every night at the Capitol during the historic occupation he launched the blog Shit Scott Walker Is Doing To My State (SSWIDTMS) which just recently passed one million views on it's youtube channel. He also ran against Scott Walker in the Republican primary of the recall election as a "Lincoln/La Follette Republican" receiving 20,000 votes.

George Macaluso comes from a family of Laborers, working for the International Headquarters and then in Michigan for more than twenty years. He documented to protests through his photography and was proud to see so many members from varied unions fight together. George is also an artist featured in the show.

Ruth Needleman is professor emeritus from Labor Studies, Indiana University. Still teaching and practicing activism, Ruth participated consistently in the Indiana battles against right-to-work, defunding of Planned Parenthood, stripping bargaining rights from teachers and opposing charter schools replacing public education in Gary. Long-time organizer, she worked with Cesar Chavez in California, was a teamster at UPS and at a plastics sweatshop in NYC. Author of Black Freedom Fighters in Steel, and many articles examining today's labor unions, Ruth used the opportunities to integrate photography.

Larry Spivack, moderator, is Regional Director for AFSCME Council 31 and the President of the Illinois Labor History Society, the deed-holder of the Haymarket Memorial in Forest Park, IL. He believes we all have a duty and obligations to do something of service to help our communities. He does this through the labor movement and the golden rule.

- About the Artists, activists, poets and storytellers - Voices from the Protests Co-sponsored by the Illinois Labor History Society


MAY 2013

Eight Hours for Work, Eight Hours for Rest, Eight Hours for What We Will: Presented by URI-EICHEN Gallery, 2101 South Halsted, Chicago Friday, May, 10th 2013 from 6:00 – 10:00pm Show open by appointment only through May 31

A series of art shows, events and music - about workMAY:
The Story of Haymarket, Labor History Tour of Pilsen with Chicago Historian Paul Durica and Labor History Tour of Pilsen Map.

Art Attack CPS Kids sculpture, Group Printing and Postcard Campaign Demanding Action from the Mayor, Live Music with Bucky Halker, Portraits of the Martyrs and pieces from the collection of the Illinois Labor History Society, silent auction to raise funds for organizing the archive of the Illinois LaborHistory Society collection: May 10, 6-10pm

 

APRIL 2013

URI-EICHEN Gallery Presents: Now is the Day / Ahora es la Dia Chicago Youth Artists and Musicians for Immigration Reform Friday, April, 12th 2013 from 6:00 – 10:00pm

Today many creative immigrant youth are growing up in and around Chicago,more American than any other nationality, but embracing everything and everyonethat makes us who we are.It is time for a change – a re-examination of whatmakes America the innovative and creative place it is: immigrants fully welcomedinto the melting pot of America. America was founded by immigrants, and stillvividly diverse because of it. Chicago area youth of immigrant heritage presenttheir diverse backgrounds, the battles being waged for equality and justice,creatively through music, visual art, spoken word and film in this group show atURI-EICHEN Gallery.

Visual Artists:

Jam One, Mario Perez, Veronica Martinez and Josef Guzman

Performance Artists:Richard Juarez (acoustic guitar) and DJ Jam One

Visual art show will be open for appointments through the end of April. CallKathy @ 312 852 7717 for appointment

 

MARCH 2013

Kathy Kelly - Seeing Through the Smokescreen: War and Peace in Afghanistan Friday, March 1st at 7:00 pm

Kathy Kelly recently returned from a 12th trip to Afghanistan where she spenta month as a guest of the Afghan Peace Volunteers in a working classneighborhood of Kabul. Kelly co-coordinates Voices for Creative Nonviolence. Sheand her colleagues live alongside ordinary people in areas afflicted by U.S.wars and weapons, learning from them and helping raise their voices on behalf ofending wars. Kelly traveled to Gaza in November 2012. She has also joined Voicesto protest drone warfare at various military bases in the U.S.

The eventis co-sponsored by Amnesty International's Security with Human Rights Campaign -Amnesty International's global movement of more than 3 million supporters aroundthe world - are working to stop, and ensure accountability for human rightsviolations committed by the U.S. government in the name of unending "globalwar." Carrie Neff Maley, Campaigner for Amnesty will be speaking about thenegative consequences for human rights of the USA's "global war" framework.


At both events we are happy to host NATO Summit Photographs by Emanuel Love

EmanuelLove is a Chicago-based freelance photographer. His work rangesfrom landscapes to portraiture. Emanuel wanted to capture "a piece of history"with his NATO series.

 

FEBRUARY 2013

UNDESTROYED: one man’s journey to Afghanistan Tuesday, February 26th 7:00 pm

In the tradition of Spalding Gray's Swimming to Cambodia, Ian Poundsrecounts the at turns humorous and inspiring story of his solo journey toAfghanistan as a response to a splintered life, landing him as the onlywesterner in an orphanage in Kabul. After four years teaching over 300 boys andgirls representative of all regions and races, Pounds gives unique insight tothe people and the country of America's longest conflict. Ultimately this is thetale of how, in living among children of war a man discovers how truly a land,its people and a broken heart can become Undestroyed. Admission Free.Donations accepted after the ninety-minute performance.

Listen to Ian Pounds interview: This is Hell! WNUR 89.3 FM Chicago
Saturday, February 23rd at 10:25 am

2012 EVENTS

DECEMBER 2012

Friday December 14, 6pm to 10pmLocal/Global Youth Human Rights Activists:Chicago Youth Snap Riot Photo WinnersFirst Annual Human Rights Day Show atURI-EICHEN Gallery

Sponsored by Amnesty International Midwest Region and the University ofChicago Human Rights Program

Opening Reception: Friday December 14, 6pm to 10pm

Panel Discussion 8pm to 9pm - The Universal Declaration of Human Rights: Doesit Matter Today?

Panel Discussion featuring: Ansou Diallo, Student Activist CoordinatorAmnesty International Illinois, Patrick Kelly, Doctoral Candidate, InternationalHistory, University of Chicago, Larry Spivack, President of the Illinois LaborHistory Society.

Amnesty International Youth Photo Show through January 2, 2013

Appointments @ 312-852 7717 URI-EICHEN Gallery, 2101 South Halsted, Chicago60608 info@URI-EICHEN.com www.uri-eichen.comwww.facebook.com/URIEICHENGallery

Ansou Diallo

Student Activist Coordinator Amnesty International USA Midwest RegionalOffice

I'm originally from Senegal; a French speaking country located in westAfrica. I joined Amnesty International Senegal in 1998.When I was a teenager, Ibelieved that I could help to end violences that was happening in the south ofSenegal, Casamance. It was said that the first president promised theinhabitants of that particular region to be an independent nation. But promiseswere not kept which resulted in a conflict that last more than 25 years today.After becoming an AI member, I got involved so much that I acquired leadershipskills that enabled me to be elected as the National Youth Coordinator.

In the mean time, I was a board member of the AI African Youth Network. Oncein the US, I decided to carry on shining the light, and I joined AmnestyInternational USA. I was recently appointed as the Student Activist Coordinatorfor the state of Illinois.

Patrick William Kelly

Patrick William Kelly is a doctoral candidate in international history at theUniversity of Chicago. He researches and teaches broadly in 20th centuryinternational history, focusing on the expansion of global civil society throughthe lens of human rights and humanitarian activism. His dissertation exploresthe surge in transnational human rights activism in the Americas (Latin America& the United States) in response to state repression in the Southern Cone fromthe late 1960s through the early 1980s.

It develops its argument through four sustained case studies in Brazil,Chile, Argentina, and the United States, seeking to understand the tensions andcontradictions that emerged when a diverse array of actors--church andsolidarity activists, political exiles, Amnesty International members,international lawyers, and bureaucrats at the United Nations and theOrganization of American States--formed tenuous coalitions over evolving notionsof human rights. His work shows how activists innovated novel techniques anddiscourses as many moved away from grandiose visions to change theworld--visions of revolution, often violent and bloody--to fashion minimalisthavens from violence. A recipient of the fellowships from the Social ScienceResearch Council as well as the Fulbright-Hays, Kelly’s study draws on archivalresearch and oral interviews in eight countries throughout the Americas andEurope. He has taught and assisted courses in the Department of History, theHuman Rights Program, the Center on Latin American Studies, and InternationalStudies.

Larry Spivack

Larry Spivack is Regional Director for AFSCME Council 31 (American Federationof State County and Municipal Employees). He began working for the union in 1984as an organizer after teaching school for five years during which time he servedas a local union Vice-President in AFSCME. He was subsequently appointed as anAFSCME staff representative. During his tenure with AFSCME he has held a varietyof titles serving in a number of capacities. His primary duties include thesupervision of staff in the field, assisting local AFSCME unions in collectivebargaining, education, internal organizing and general day to day problemsolving as well as helping to implement the policies and goals of Council 31.Mr. Spivack is President of the Illinois Labor History Society (ILHS). TheIllinois Labor History Society is one of the most distinguished labor historysocieties in the United States. The ILHS holds the deed to the HaymarketMemorial in Forest Park, a National Historic Site, and was one of the keyorganizations that helped obtain the monument at the site of the Haymarket eventin Chicago.

Mr. Spivack is married and lives in Oak Park. He believes we all have a dutyand obligation to do something of service to help our communities. He does thisthrough the labor movement and the golden rule.


NOVEMBER 2012

Thursday, November 15th, 7pm - 9pm Talks by Leah Bolger and Abdul MalikMujahid - The Drone War in Pakistan 2101 South Halsted

Leah Bolger is national president of Veterans for Peace. A commander in theUS Navy, she retired in 2000 after a 20 year career. She recently returned froma trip to Pakistan, where she was part of a delegation of peace activists thatjoined a march with thousands of Pakistanis against the US/NATO drone attacks.

Imam Abdul Malik Mujahid is the founder of the Muslim Peace Coalition. He isthe Chair of the Council for a Parliament of the World's Religions, the premiereinterfaith organization in the world. He was one of the initiators of theCoalition Against NATO/G8 War and Poverty Agenda last year. He will speak aboutwhat is happening in Pakistan, the Afghan War, and the response there to thedrone attacks.

The event is sponsored by the Anti-War Committee

We are hosted by URI-EICHEN Gallery, which this month has a show entitled“Reflections on NATO in the New Chicago” -http://www.chicagoartistsmonth.org/nato-reflections-new-chicago

The artists feature subjects that are anecdotes of the NATO Summit in May.

OCTOBER 2012

October 19th (6pm-10pm), 20th (12pm-8pm), 21st (12pm-6pm)

Kathy Steichen & Christopher Urias- Chicago Artist Month Show & Pilsen OpenStudios, Reflections on NATO in the New Chicago

Chicago is a new city under new leadership and under the stresses of theeconomic crisis that has faced the world for the last few years. Thisexhibition, comprised of monoprints by Christopher Urias and Kathy Steichen,created in the weeks after the NATO Summit in Chicago in May of 2012 reflectsthe new realities and the struggles Chicagoans have waged to have a voice forchange and a better city.

SEPTEMBER 2012

September 7 and 14, 6pm-10pm - Peggy Lipschutz

is an artist, book illustrator, political activist, labor unionist, feminist,pacifist, humanist. This is the story of one woman’s unwavering commitment toart, peace, justice and social change. September 7 and 14, 6pm-10pm - Also adocumentary about Peggy Lipschutz's life will be screened.

AUGUST 2012

August 10, 6pm to 10pm

Women's Graphics Collective : Posters from the The Chicago Women's LiberationUnion (CWLU), the first women's liberation union in the country, was formed in1969 to help unite the emerging women's movement in Chicago.



JULY 2012

July 13, 2012 - 6pm to 10pm

Kathy Steichen & Christopher Urias: Print, Collage and Assemblage - Book,Paper and Textile PART 2

JUNE 2012

June 8, 2012 - 6pm to 10pm

Kathy Steichen & Christopher Urias: Print, Collage and Assemblage - Book,Paper and Textile

MAY 2012

Saturday May 12, 2012 from 2pm-4pm

Portoluz (Portoluz.org) presents Occuprint Discussion Group - Poster Art andPolitical Strategy a program in the series WPA 2.0, a brand new deal

Roy Villalobos, Muralist

Larry Spivack Illinois Labor History Society

Friday May 11, 2012 from 5pm to 11pm

Art of the Occupy Movement Sponsored by Portoluz, Occuprint and URI-EICHENGallery

Special Guest

Congresswoman Jan Schakowsky will be speaking about the Occupy Movement andthe fight for Progressive Politics in America at 5pm

URI-EICHEN Gallery welcomes you to Pilsen for a graphic design postershow ofart from the Occupy Movement in cooperation with Occuprint. Occuprint Showcasesposters from the worldwide Occupy movement. Friday May 11, 2012 from 5pm to 11pm-

Portoluz.org

Portoluz presents Art of the Occupy Movement a program in the series WPA 2.0,a brand new deal

Uri-Eichen Gallery welcomes you to Pilsen for a graphic design poster show ofart from the Occupy Movement in cooperation with Occuprint. Occuprint showcasesposters from the worldwide Occupy movement. Posters on Occuprint can provide animportant bridge between supporters who may not speak the same language, yetknow they are part of the same struggle. www.uri-eichen.com

Occuprint is dedicated to the poster art of the global Occupy movement. TheOccuprint website is meant to connect people with this work, and provide a baseof support for print-related media within the #Occupy movement. All postersdisplayed on the site are part of the creative commons, and available to bedownloaded for noncommercial use, though we ask that artists are givenattribution.

Our Print Lab is a collaboration with the Occupy Wall Street Screen PrintingGuild, an official working group within the New York City General Assembly.Everyone is welcome to print with them. We house a collection of graphics forscreenprinting, many of which are used by the Guild itself. We look forward tocreating and distributing more printed matter by supporting the development ofscreenprinting labs at other occupations, and by printing more of the wonderfulposters that we are receiving.

Occuprint is currently being curated by Molly Fair, Jesse Goldstein, JoshMacPhee and John Boy. We are always open to finding new collaborators, so pleasedo get in touch.

APRIL 2012

Friday, April 13, 6pm-10pm Rebel Arts Collective, Occupy Chicago Art

We have 11 artists from the Occupy Chicago Rebel Arts Collective showing in the upcoming opening! Occupy Chicago Art, Occupy Chicago Rebel Arts Collective

MARCH 2012

Friday March 9, 6pm-10pm Scenes from Star Planet -

Christopher Urias



WHEN

Second Friday's of the Month

HOURS

6PM - 10PM

WHERE

URI-EICHEN Gallery
2101 South Halsted CHICAGO Illinois 60608